Benefits of Part-time Teaching

After leaving the university, many college graduates face the reality that there are no enough jobs for everyone. Some, especially those holding impressive transcript of records, are tapped by their respective alma maters as part-time instructors.

This group, because they are not regular employees of the school, do not receive the benefits that the other employees get like leave credits, Christmas bonus, 13th month pay, etc.  However, there are other benefits  that part-time teaching gives to fresh graduates. Here are some of them:

1.  Access to school facilities

The library, the museum, the hospital and the dental clinic are some facilities that help us build and improve both our body and our soul.  Most schools extend their services only to those who are connected with the institution. This, is, therefore one huge bonus for those who are no longer students.

2.  Community affiliation

Some schools can really be brutal in the contract they offer to their part-time instructors.  A contract stipulating that “there is no employer-employee relationship between the school and the instructor” is demoralizing to a neophyte.

However, no matter what the contract says, part-time instructors can build friendships with fellow instructors, other employees and students. Hence, they build their own network of friends.  This is a lot better than being jobless and being away from where the real action is happening, i.e., the workplace.

 


3
.  Self-confidence is enhanced

Teachers, always, have a ready audience: their students.  Hence, they make it a point that their students do not lose interest in the classroom activities and in the teachers themselves.

Teachers are performers.  Aside from the endless reading and researching they do, they likewise do public speaking.

Teachers also tell jokes.  And these jokes have to be updated constantly in order not to  bore their students.  In the process, they discover a lot of possibilities within themselves that were unknown to them before.  Teaching, whether regular or full-time, builds a teacher’s confidence.

4.  Resume starts to build up

A job applicant’s teaching experience can be impressive to future employers.  On the other hand, if a part-time teacher decides to stay in the same institution after he/she finishes graduate school, the advantage is hers/his.  Administrators usually go for those who have been with them.  This makes sense.  It’s like the part-time instructor is constantly having a teaching demonstration throughout his/her two-semester or two-year stint as a teacher.  It has been said that teaching is like wine: one gets better through the years.  And school administrators know this.

5.  Part-time teaching gives income 

To become a full-fledged university instructor, one must possess the right qualifications, e.g., a master’s degree.  Most part-time instructors pursue graduate studies while teaching. They send themselves to school by paying for their own tuition fees.

The income they get from part-time teaching may not be very impressive but at least it gives them the chance to be independent from their parents and to improve themselves as persons, as teachers or as future job applicants.

 

Part-time teaching therefore, is valuable in making a person. In general, the status and the money are of less importance compared to the benefits that part-time teaching can give to a young professional.  It may just be the springboard toward a better career.

Ageism: Media Influences and Older Americans

by Brian C. McGuire

Mainstream American society continues to stereotype Older Americans as communicated through the media. This presents itself a developing problem not only for Older Americans but for the mainstream population as well.

Mainstream American society often views the aging population in reference to stereotypes communicated through the media. This form of imagery often distorts our ability to perceive others in the real world. A number of investigators now believe that mass media is responsible for shaping our attitude of older Americans and the aging process (Bazzini, McIntosh, Smith, Cook & Harris, 1997; Bell, 1992; Fillmer, 1984; Fine, Mortimer, & Roberts, 1990; Fisher, 1992; Larson, Kubey, Colletti, 1989).

The persuasive capabilities of the media are powerful. Scientific reports and a growing body of literature suggest that American society learns to form negative associations of older persons through the use of media forms (Bazzini, McIntosh, Smith, Cook & Harris, 1997; Bell, 1992; Fillmer, 1984; Fine, Mortimer, & Roberts, 1990; Fisher, 1992; Larson, Kubey, Colletti, 1989). Bazzini, et al. (1997) analyzed the way in which motion pictures portray older Americans. They discovered that older people were portrayed more negatively than younger people. Moreover, older women were subject to age discrimination more so than men (Bazzini, et al., 1997; Harrison, 1991). Fisher (1992) designed an intersession course to help future sociologists analyze popular commercial images of older people (Fisher, 1992).

Fisher’s results were promising: combining commercial films with related reading materials such as The Aging Family; Elderly Parents, Grandparents and Siblings proved beneficial in helping his students to make distinctions between media biases and true behavior patterns of older Americans. In recent years, the media have projected more positive images toward older Americans. Bell (1992) examined five prime-time television programs in which older people were cast as central characters.

These television shows included The Golden Girls, Murder She Wrote, In the Heat of the Night, Matlock, and Jake and the Fatman. According to Bell, previous media portrayals of older people appearing “comical, stubborn, eccentric, and foolish” were replaced with more progressive images. These images allow older people to appear “powerful, affluent, active, admired, and sexy.” Although Bell gave favorable reviews on what he hypothesized to be a discourse in aging on television, he cautioned researchers that demographics of older Americans on television were non-representative of the aging population and should be further investigated.

Print media and other visual forms have been found to influence our perception of the aging population (Fillmer, 1984; Nussbaum & Robinson, 1984; Rosenwasser, McBride, Brantley, & Ginsburg, 1986; Starr and Weiner, 1993). Magazines’ portrayal of older persons has reinforced negative biases held by society for many years (Nussbaum & Robinson, 1984). In a pictorial study examining differentiation ability of children, Rosenwasser, McBride, Brantley and Ginsburg (1983) reported well-defined negative bias in children’s attitudes toward older people. Conversely, in a more recent study, Weber et al.(1996) found positive results when exposing children to apperception conditions. In another study, the response pattern of children in grades four through six was measured while exposed to pictures of adults of varying ages (Fillmer, 1984).

Fillmer found ambiguous evidence of age stereotyping among children suggesting the need for additional studies. Finally, in a literature review, Starr and Weiner (1993) clarified some misconceptions in the use of pictorial measurement techniques (e.g., PAAM). They reminded clinical researchers and others of its proven value for training undergraduates and graduates in gerontology courses. The average television viewing time for pre-adolescents is four hours per day (Larson, Kubey, & Colletti, 1989). By the time children reach full adolescence, they will have viewed as much as 22,000 hours of television (Bell, 1992; Fillmer, 1984). With the aging population representing only 4 percent of this media type (in reality, older people make up 15 percent of the total population), investigators feel that the absence of older persons on television combined with a lack of knowledge of aging cause people to form negative associations with older Americans.

Although television’s persuasion capabilities are powerful, visual and other media resources begin to take precedence early in adolescence (Larson, Kubey,& Colletti, 1989). Today, approximately 33 percent of all high school seniors report reading magazines, while another 20 percent report reading non-schoolbooks daily. American children spend more than eight hours a day exposed to some form of social medium, whether its uses are primary or a secondary source of activity. Newspapers, magazines, book readings, pictures and a host of other media forms contribute to the development of ageist behavior.

25 Myths and Facts About Sex

Relationships, especially sexual ones, undoubtedly play a major role with regards to our mood and well being. It is not uncommon to find couples unhappy, over conscious and confused in bed, particularly because of their misconceptions or notions about sex.

Sex, a biological fact, is not much talked about in our societies. When a girl or boy lands up in teens with fascinations, curiosities and hormonal stimulation; he/she does not have much knowledge to bank upon and left with no choice but to consult other immature friends, search web or ask Internet pals. Here is the gist of 25 myths and facts about sex will help fade all confusions hovering since ages.

MYTHS 

1.   Women also ejaculate during sexual intercourse.

2.   Simultaneous orgasms are a must for sexual satisfaction.

3.   Only men have wet dreams.

4.   Wet dreams are sexual disorders.

5.   Venereal disease is cured if the man has sex with a virgin.

6.   Frequent masturbation makes the penis shrink.

7.   Special food and exercise will make the penis grow big.

8.   Masturbation leads to nervous breakdown.

9.   Vasectomy makes a man impotent.

10.   Men have stronger sexual urges than women.

11.   Anal sex is only practised by homosexuals.

12.   A normal man should be able to get an erection whenever he wants it.

13.   A man is not a male if he cannot get a penile erection.

14.   Menopause puts an end to a women’s sex life.

15.   Imparting sex education to youngsters will lead them to promiscuity.

16.   A woman should orgasm with intercourse alone.

17.   A woman must bleed when she has sex for the first time.

18.   Sex during menstruation is unhygienic and unsafe.

19.   A girl cannot get pregnant the first time she has sexual intercourse.

20.   A female cannot get pregnant while she is breastfeeding.

21.   There is an absolutely “safe” period for sexual intercourse during which intercourse cannot cause pregnancy.

22. Having a male withdraw his penis from a female’s vagina before he ejaculates or “comes” (coition) is a good way to prevent pregnancy.

23. You’re a homosexual if you’ve had sex with, or even had a “sexy” dream about, someone of the same sex.