Effective Pre-K and Kindergarten Classroom Management

Moving-Clip System: A Chart with Super Day (Happy Face) and Bad Day (Sad Face)

This is a great system to help the students regulate their own behavior. Each time when an individual student is mis-behaved, the teacher will ask him/her to move his/her clip down one level. The wall chart has 4 levels. Each student has his/her own clip with a name on it. They all start the day with the clips being placed on the top of the chart at the Super Day level (Happy Face). When each individual is being asked to move the clip when he/she mis-behaves, the clip goes down one level. They are given 4 chances during the day: from “Super Day” to “Good Day”, then to “OK Day” and the bottom is “Bad Day”.

If they ever move the clip in any given day, they are grounded and won’t be able to trade in the stars for a treasure chest toy even if they reach the 20-star reward level right on that day. But this system starts a brand new day each day, so they will still get the chance to go get a treasure chest toy if they don’t move the clip the following day. It is like your account has to be in good standing in order to receive the reward.

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Using Signals or Sign Language

The teacher has taught the class to use some hand signals for the need to use the bathroom and to go for a sip of water. The sign language of the letter “W” is for water, and “R” is for restroom. This way you can eliminate the students from talking to express their needs. Sometimes when one starts talking, the whole class can end up going out of control fairly quickly. This is an effective way to keep them quiet and yet not to ignore their demand.

Make Every Activity to be Associated with a Song

Create or find a song for clean-up, line-up, etc.  When the play time is finished, students are asked to put away the toys and to clean up the room and they use a clean-up song to engage with this activity. And when they need to line up, they will sing the line up song. In every action they do, they sing altogether and this actually allows them to get the job done quickly and smoothly.  I think music often works the wonder to help the kids to get motivated and to get their attention to follow through the entire process and you will get the end result from what it is needed to be done.

Take Time to Relax and Refresh with Music, So the Students Can Get Their Attention Back to Focus on the Teaching Again

One day I learned from our teacher, Mrs. Fristad, that there are times during the day in the class that you may find some students seem to start loosing their focus. Then you can start leading a song, let the students all stand up to stretch, to move around, jump and sing-along. After a short break like that, you can be sure to get their attention and focus back on track again. I learned a great deal from this. Dealing with young children, they easily loose their focus and their mind may just wander around. Singing together can let their steam out and they can then start to re-focus again. Learning can easily revolve around music. Students and the teacher all have fun together and this will boost up the spirits within the classroom and it goes a long way!

Here is a great example you may want to try:

The ACT vs SAT

Taking the SAT or ACT is a rite of passage for high school students who are preparing for college. Students may take one or the other—or both, depending on their college prospects. But what are the major differences between the SAT and the ACT? What are the advantages to taking one over another? And which test might be a better fit for you?

Staying on subject

“Well-rounded” is one of those terms that gets tossed around in admissions brochures and by college recruiters; it essentially means that they’re looking for students with broad interests and strengths in more than one subject. But for students who’ve already chosen a major, a test that showcases their talent in a particular subject might be best. The SAT has three major sections: math, critical reasoning, and writing. The ACT, on the other hand, has five sections: math, English, reading, science and writing. Because the ACT includes science and English sections, future science and liberal arts students might want to take the ACT, although the SAT’s math and critical reasoning sections can serve the same purpose.

Beating the clock

It seems a little unfair that the SAT has three sections and a three-hour, forty-five minute time limit, while the ACT gives you just under three hours to complete five sections. But the devil is in the details: guessing is discouraged for SAT takers, with a penalty of a quarter-point for wrong answers. There is no penalty, however, for wrong answers on the ACT. And while both tests have an essay section, it’s optional—which means students can save time by simply skipping the essay section. Finally, the math section—feared by future English majors everywhere—generally has easier problems on the SAT, but there are fewer, more difficult problems on the ACT.

So, which test should you take, and how do you get your best score? First, find out which tests are preferred by the colleges and universities to which you are applying. Some students take both tests more than once because they hope to improve their chances for a higher score.

No matter which test you decide to take, using study guides, trying new ways to study, and using a vocabulary list can help you with both tests. Both the ACT and the SAT are just exams to demonstrate your readiness for college subjects; doing your best can improve your chances of getting into your dream school.

Written on behalf of American InterContinental University.

Benefits of Part-time Teaching

After leaving the university, many college graduates face the reality that there are no enough jobs for everyone. Some, especially those holding impressive transcript of records, are tapped by their respective alma maters as part-time instructors.

This group, because they are not regular employees of the school, do not receive the benefits that the other employees get like leave credits, Christmas bonus, 13th month pay, etc.  However, there are other benefits  that part-time teaching gives to fresh graduates. Here are some of them:

1.  Access to school facilities

The library, the museum, the hospital and the dental clinic are some facilities that help us build and improve both our body and our soul.  Most schools extend their services only to those who are connected with the institution. This, is, therefore one huge bonus for those who are no longer students.

2.  Community affiliation

Some schools can really be brutal in the contract they offer to their part-time instructors.  A contract stipulating that “there is no employer-employee relationship between the school and the instructor” is demoralizing to a neophyte.

However, no matter what the contract says, part-time instructors can build friendships with fellow instructors, other employees and students. Hence, they build their own network of friends.  This is a lot better than being jobless and being away from where the real action is happening, i.e., the workplace.

 


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.  Self-confidence is enhanced

Teachers, always, have a ready audience: their students.  Hence, they make it a point that their students do not lose interest in the classroom activities and in the teachers themselves.

Teachers are performers.  Aside from the endless reading and researching they do, they likewise do public speaking.

Teachers also tell jokes.  And these jokes have to be updated constantly in order not to  bore their students.  In the process, they discover a lot of possibilities within themselves that were unknown to them before.  Teaching, whether regular or full-time, builds a teacher’s confidence.

4.  Resume starts to build up

A job applicant’s teaching experience can be impressive to future employers.  On the other hand, if a part-time teacher decides to stay in the same institution after he/she finishes graduate school, the advantage is hers/his.  Administrators usually go for those who have been with them.  This makes sense.  It’s like the part-time instructor is constantly having a teaching demonstration throughout his/her two-semester or two-year stint as a teacher.  It has been said that teaching is like wine: one gets better through the years.  And school administrators know this.

5.  Part-time teaching gives income 

To become a full-fledged university instructor, one must possess the right qualifications, e.g., a master’s degree.  Most part-time instructors pursue graduate studies while teaching. They send themselves to school by paying for their own tuition fees.

The income they get from part-time teaching may not be very impressive but at least it gives them the chance to be independent from their parents and to improve themselves as persons, as teachers or as future job applicants.

 

Part-time teaching therefore, is valuable in making a person. In general, the status and the money are of less importance compared to the benefits that part-time teaching can give to a young professional.  It may just be the springboard toward a better career.