You are here: Home » Death » Burial as Nature Intended

Burial as Nature Intended

Change to the habits of millennia, where burial is concerned, could well be seen as sacrilegous, but the burgeoning world population and demand for land on which to build make alternatives to burial seem very attractive indeed.

Courting controversy is always a good way to get the little grey cells jumping about, and my latest thoughts have been about the disposal of human remains after death.  Human bodies are obviously bio-degradable, and in fact provide lots of nutrition for any life form that feeds on them after death, but what is this obsession with putting those remains in places where nature is kept largely at bay?

Funeral practices are our way of dealing with the dead, paying tribute to a life lived, but the powerful belief in corpses being hazardous to health is simply not true, so is it  not about time that we stopped removing so much potential building land from town planners?

Change to the habits of millennia, where burial is concerned, could well be seen as sacrilegious, but the burgeoning world population and demand for land on which to build make alternatives to burial seem very attractive indeed.

Latest disposal techniques include promession – the bodies are freeze-dried with liquid nitrogen gas, then shaken down into dust which can be scattered wherever the bereaved wish – and resomation, which involves the dissolving of soft bodily tissues in a sterile solution that can go into the water supply, the bone ash left over useful in fertilizing a memorial plant, for example.

These both, to me anyway, seem much more eco-friendly than the awful prospect of being the subject of a horrid cosmetic exercise by a fussy undertaker before either burial in a wooden box or a 900 degree Celcius burning.

As gets quoted at every  burial service, earth returns to earth and dust to dust, so what is wrong with changing the rules to allow those who wish to be given back to nature after death, by being subjected to a green burial to have their wish?

If natural burial effectively amounts to composting, as some would have it, what leads them to suppose that the natural processes happening in consecrated ground are any different?  It is utterly delusional to believe that decay is somehow more acceptable in a graveyard, and surely the surrendering of all that made up your physical form to the natural world is just the order of things?

7
Liked it
User Comments
  1. lauralu

    On December 1, 2012 at 12:26 pm


    Many Christians are cremated when they die and I believe God made us and can put us back together in the resurection.
    There is something morbid about constantly visiting a grave but I will buried along side my husband if I have the choice, who knows what the future holds? Only God.

  2. sloanie

    On December 1, 2012 at 9:06 pm


    For me Cremation is my only wish.
    Food for thought in this excellent article.

Post Comment
Powered by Powered by Triond
-->