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Genocide of Christopher Columbus

My thoughts on Columbus’ arrival in America, and the genocide of Native Americans.

I think that Columbus is guilty of genocide. I believe this because in his own journal he wrote about how easy the natives do what they want them to, and how they would make good slaves “They have no weapons and are all naked without any skill in arms and are very cowardly so that a thousand would not challenge three,” says the journal for December 16th “… Thus they are useful to be commanded and to be made to labor and sow and to do everything else of which there is need and build towns and be taught to wear clothes and learn our customs.” I think Columbus along with the people who came with him were guilty of genocide.

I believe this because he followed the steps to commit genocide. First the group was already divided into colonists and natives. Then the Natives were dehumanized and treated like animals. “Then Columbus made a plan to capture the natives and send them to Europe to work as slaves. Next most of the Natives were slain either by the hands of their captors, their own hands, or from overwork, or they were captured as slaves. “The fugitives in the mountains were hunted down with hounds; if they escaped capture, they often died of disease or starvation. Thousands killed themselves by taking a poison made from cassava. Many parents killed their infants to spare them a living death under Spanish rule. In only two years, half the 250,000 Indians on the island were dead… it was the beginning of genocide for the native population. By 1548…not 500 Indians remained in Hispaniola” And finally today people deny that Columbus is guilty of Genocide. Saying that he was a great man who discovered the new world and neglect to say that he was also the starter of genocide against the whole Native American people.

Christopher Columbus started out to find a new sea route to India and took with him three ships the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria. After about 5 weeks Land was sighted at 2 a.m. on October 12, 1492, by a sailor named Rodrigo de Triana, Columbus claimed they discovered a new land, he named it San Salvador. The land had already been discovered and was inhabited by many Native people. The native people he encountered were the Lucayan, Taíno or Arawak. They were a peaceful people who weren’t trying to hurt the Colonists. However the colonists didn’t have the same intentions. In Columbus’ journal he wrote about the natives. “It appears to me, that the people are ingenious, and would be good servants and I am of opinion that they would very readily become Christians, as they appear to have no religion.” Later in his journal he wrote, “I could conquer the whole of them with 50 men, and govern them as I pleased.” The Taínos were enslaved by the Spaniards and worked to death in the mines and plantations they established on Hispaniola. Columbus imposed a burdensome tribute on every Taíno, which if he failed to pay; he would suffer mutilation or execution. When Columbus was in “the new world” he did exploring near Cuba and Hispaniola. The Santa Maria ran aground and had to be abandoned. The local natives let Columbus leave some of his men behind. “Columbus left 39 men and founded the settlement of La Navidad in what is now present-day Haiti.” Later before returning to Spain Columbus decided that since the natives were so easy to control he’d take some back as slaves. “Columbus kidnapped some ten to twenty-five Indians and took them back with him. Only seven or eight of the Indians arrived in Spain alive, but they made quite an impression on Seville.” Columbus’ voyage back may also have brought syphilis back from the New World.

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  1. EdRoberts

    On February 3, 2008 at 2:27 pm


    I agree, Spain and the Spanish people are horrible. They go against everything America has ever stood for; we should immediately move to throw them out of the U.N. and we should deport every Spanish person from America. Thank God for the rest of Europe and us Americans!

  2. Cory Williams

    On February 8, 2008 at 9:23 pm


    I agree that there were many facts that Christopher Columbus was infact very cruel man but one must remember during that time that was the way the world was and we can’t help the fact that the past had such horrid times. And to the person who posted before me you should be ashamed at what you said one cannot judge people by their history but if you are just a person who dosent understand the why there is a U.N. you sholdn’t talk as if you knew what was right.We as people need to be togeather and it is your type of thinkers who hold this world back form what it could be.

  3. EdRoberts

    On February 12, 2008 at 3:56 pm


    Corey:

    I’m glad you agree with me that the Spanish are horrible people; I know that when I was in Spain I often felt like kicking their arses.

    Thank God that we took over from the Spanish in America and made everything okay for the Indians. I know that the Nobel Red Man never harmed anyone and lived at peace with all their Red brothers and the environment.

  4. Ali

    On February 27, 2008 at 6:00 pm


    Columbus was a an evil man and comited acts of genocide and terrorism!!!EdRoberts your daft and you dont know what you are talking about, why are you being predacious to one nations people, spain is a beutiful country and spanish people are very nice.
    every nation that has been colonized has not recovered from its effects, to propser one nation your nation whent to destablize other,its funny how history has a funny way of repeating its self, we saw it in veitnam, now in iraq and in 40years time in iran and 40years after that south korea lol

  5. EdRoberts

    On March 2, 2008 at 9:19 pm


    Ali:

    You are laughing out loud at genocide! Wow, you must be one of those evil Spanish people.

    Why do you think what happened in Vietnam, Iraq, korea and Iran is funny? Sounds like you are related to Columbus.

  6. Kimberly

    On March 24, 2008 at 10:15 pm


    EdRoberts:
    You say that you agree with Columbus being an evil person who commited genocide, yet you sit there and talk freely about your hatred toward Spain and Spanish people.
    The first stage of genocide is Classification, and that is exactly what you are doing. You are distinguishing between “us and them”, seperating them from yourself based on their nationality. This happened hundreds of years ago, maybe you should be focusing your time and energy on something useful, like the genocide that is occuring on our plant this second in Darfur.

  7. Laroi

    On March 25, 2008 at 1:06 pm


    Kimberly,

    I have to disagree with you about your comments to Ed Roberts. I have seen the hatred and disrespect, which Spain and Spanish people have towards people they don’t like. Being half Trini and Moroccan, I have noticed their hatred towards Indians of India and those of African descent. Also living in Tampa, Florida, I see it even more. It has been a long history of Spain to hate people. Since the horror of what they did to Moors and Jews, to their fascism of the 20th century.

    Have you ever met a Spanish person that didn’t feel more superior than the rest of humanity? I really don’t see any differnce between their hatred and that of the Germany nazis. Still to this day, many Spanish people will not speak nor look at individuals who are darker or none descent from Europe. I guess it is hard to leave the history of one’s descent.

  8. jessica

    On July 30, 2008 at 9:49 pm


    After studying much about this subject, it seems to me, that one would be able to argue both sides.
    Yes, the “discovery” made by Columbus could be considered a genocide for many reasons. But if one was to actually read the U.N’s definition of genocide, the you could argue that there are many many other cases of genocide in American and everywhere across the world. I’m not quite sure of the real wording, but a part says, along these lines, “that the deliberate murder of a group of people of the same nationality or ethnice group, that destroys all, most or a part of that group is constituted as a genocide.”
    after reading this, one could say that if a person went into a baptist church and killed 5 people that that would be a genocide against baptists.
    yes, Columbus did treat the Native Americans badly, but that is the way the world was back then. Times were violent. Brute force was the answer for almost anything. Yes, its barbaric, but i am pretty positive that if people from the fifteenth century could only see us today and our actions, they would think that we are barbaric.
    Columbus and his men did kill many Native Americans or sell them into slavery, but the fact is that most of the Native Americans died of communicable diseases that were brought over with the Europeans. It was not intended to give them diseases, therefore this cannot be considered genocide. The Native Americans had never has these diseases and therefore had no immunization towards them. They were defenseless. Clearly if you look at the statistics, more Native Americans died from these early diseases then being brutally slaughtered and starved.
    Yes, the acts committed by Columbus and other early explorers were cruel, inhumane and just plain wrong, but i believe that you cannot consider it a genocide, because he did not intentionally plan to kill of the Native American race.

  9. Sarah

    On August 3, 2008 at 6:08 am


    EdRoberts!
    How can you say stuff like that?
    Your from America right… and your saying Spanish people are evil and have much hatred for everyone?
    You Said “we should immediately move to throw them out of the U.N.” do you even know what the U.N. is? if you did – you wouldn’t be saying those things.
    The UN is a protector for everyone
    I’d like to tell you that AMERICA isn’t the whole world
    so you can’t just throw them out of the UN – because they are doing great help to save this world against people like you
    You also said “Why do you think what happened in Vietnam, Iraq, korea and Iran is funny?”
    do you realise – that America started 2 of those wars (Iraq + Iran), America helped in the war in Korea and Vietnam
    you are a massive hypocrite
    You’re one of those people who think America is number 1
    OPEN YOUR EYES TO THE CRUELTY YOUR COUNTRY HAS ON A LOT OF THINGS
    It is SO frustrating

    And the worst part is – you guys are pulling my country in with you!
    We don’t want to, but we have to
    do you know why?
    Because you threaten to hurt our country if we aren’t allies with yours

  10. greeneyes

    On August 5, 2008 at 6:16 am


    No I think Christopher was only trying to sound the horn that there was new lands. Word of slaves and gold was simply a way to please the royal courts. I think Christopher was wrongfully arrested and stripped of his position of governor of Americas because the royal courts wanted it all for themselves. The real genocide happened after they took the lands from Christopher. Which is when the bloody campaigns to conquer the lands began. But Christopher was at odds with the governor Nicolás de Ovando who started to slaughter the natives in order to control them. I think its possible that most of the history we read about when it comes to Christopher Columbus is highly tampered with. Read about Nicolás de Ovando before you start falling into the traps of lies. Ask yourself why would they arrest Christopher and turn around and start slaughtering the natives and conquering there lands. Didn’t they claim that Christopher was mistreating the natives? Yea I’m so sure he did even when he was begging the natives for food while stranded in 1504. Christopher Columbus was begging the natives for food. Meanwhile Niclas de Ovando who was said to dislike Christopher was planning to slaughter them and sell the captives as slaves.

  11. lovegirl 101

    On August 26, 2008 at 7:23 am


    How can any of you say such horrible things yes the spanish and spain have done many horrible things to a great deal of our people.
    But that doesn’t make them all bad….. I’m from america and i understand how you all feel but even if SOME of the people are wrong it doesn’t make it right for us to commit something even worse than what they have done we are dissbanning all of those …
    those families that have no homes and are trying to come to america to be free and have a chance…to LIVE
    You can think what you want but this IS the land of the free and the HOME of the brave so what makes us any better than them cuz i am an american and i beleive that ALL should be welcome and FREE!!!!!

  12. steve

    On August 26, 2008 at 11:06 am


    i think columbus is a murderer

  13. lovegirl101

    On August 27, 2008 at 6:48 am


    yes,this may be true but that doesn’t make all spain and spanish bad yes i beleive that columbus killed and rapped and stole but thats him not the rest of them i mean come on are you all telling me that none of you have ever had a friend that was from spain or was spanish i do understand your point of view but if some one doesn’t speak for them then who will…..you guys never even gave them a chance.

  14. lalala123lalala

    On August 27, 2008 at 6:51 am


    I think that the spainish should be able to come over cause there looking for a good life to just like us and i under stan every body elses point of veiw to but I belive that just cause you are from spain dose not mean any thing it should not degrad you for no reason.But thats my point of veiw….. cool man!!!

  15. lovegirl101

    On August 28, 2008 at 7:06 am


    steve how can you speak so fouly towards people you have no right i can’t believe you would say such things and how dare you use those words you should be ashamed!!!!!! i may not be any to ask you for anything but do you go to emma donnan. cuz if you do then write back…

  16. lovegirl101

    On August 28, 2008 at 7:22 am


    hey lalala123lalala
    i just wanted to say hi and thank you for you comment becuz not very many people would agree with me on this website and it makes me really happy to kno that someone else knos how i feel

  17. i hate u

    On August 28, 2008 at 10:50 am


    i hate u

  18. lovegirl101

    On August 29, 2008 at 6:58 am


    hay steve what are you gonna do about me goin to emma donnan and what per. do you have u.s. history wit mr.bonner i would like to know and are you cute!!! YES or NO!!!

  19. lalala123lalala

    On August 29, 2008 at 7:01 am


    hey steve ooooo are you and lovegirl101 into each other oooooo
    hehe haha j/k

    duces homie

  20. lalala123lalala

    On August 29, 2008 at 7:04 am


    is your real name steven???

  21. lalala123lalala

    On August 29, 2008 at 7:13 am


    ???TROUTMAN???

  22. lovegirl101

    On August 29, 2008 at 7:16 am


    Hey steve i know that today is the last day for the reasearch on this project but still write back cuz i can still read it duces!!!

  23. steve

    On August 29, 2008 at 10:56 am


    maybe i am but maybe not
    who wants to no

    so how about meet me by mr booners class when schools over.

  24. lalala123lalala

    On September 2, 2008 at 7:03 am


    what if idont want to tell you my name but i’ll meet you after school today by mr.bonner’s class make sure you4r there .O.K.!!!

  25. lovegirl101

    On September 2, 2008 at 7:12 am


    i’ll come to and we’ll see if your really who we think you are!!!!
    cuz you may be surprised at nwho we are

    we’ll see you after school…….steve!

  26. lovegirl101

    On September 2, 2008 at 7:16 am


    lalala123lalala

    hey girl whats up me nothing i just wanted to say hi

  27. lalala123lalala

    On September 2, 2008 at 7:16 am


    yes we will

  28. sexybabe108

    On September 2, 2008 at 12:17 pm


    hey steve are you there

  29. sexybabe108

    On September 2, 2008 at 12:20 pm


    what r some thoutghts on chris… is he a muder

  30. sexybabe108

    On September 2, 2008 at 12:21 pm


    hello is any body on this site

  31. me

    On September 6, 2008 at 11:35 am


    lol Christopher hung people 13 at a time to commemorate the Lord

  32. bcuzimblack

    On September 11, 2008 at 3:56 pm


    so listen, can i has yo numbah.?!

  33. steve

    On September 11, 2008 at 3:57 pm


    im a homo.(:

  34. hotie4u

    On September 21, 2008 at 6:28 pm


    sup

  35. hotie4u

    On September 21, 2008 at 6:29 pm


    message me

  36. Mark, UK

    On February 4, 2009 at 3:38 am


    Its totally accurate actually – read the history books written by both himself, and the monks of the time – even the Spanish religious aristocracy and eventually the government found his methods abhorent.

    He took the very worst excesses of the Spanish inquisition (torture and murder) and amplified them a million times.

    The estimates of the number of Latin Americians who died under the murderous campaign of Colombus and his followers is estimated at in excess of 10,000,000, and killed both a far larger number and percentage of ethnic people than the WW2 holocaust against the Jews.

    If that does not classify as genocide, then I really dont know what does.

    PS And before anyone accuses me of being anti-semitic, my father is Jewish, and I’ve visited most of the holocaust memorials in Europe (Auchwitz, etc).

    The difference with Hitler is that we dont have a “lets thank Hitler for the autobahn, the jet-engine and rocket technology day”, but we do have one thanking Colombus for his equal butchery…

    I dont hold anything against the Spanish today, and I love Americia – but to pretend Colombus and his followers were anything but genocidal tirants of the very worst kind (far, far worse than anyone in his age) is to perpetuate a lie.

    Ask anyone who knows Latin Americian history in Colombia (or other parts of Lantin Americia) today (Colombia is a US ally, by the way) and the Spanish were’nt driven out until 400 years later, and completely wiped out the native cultures and people (far, far worse that in the US or Mexico from what I know of those cultures), and indeed the Spanish are -hated- to this day.

    I don’t pretend to know US history in anything like the same depth, but if you read the accounts of Colombus and the other Spanish explorers who followed him, its a sad depressing tale of mass-scale murder that is barely fit for reading.

  37. Mark, UK - Evidence

    On February 4, 2009 at 4:00 am


    “During his second voyage, Columbus and his men instituted a policy in Hispaniola which has been referred to by numerous historians as genocide. The native Taino people of the island were systematically enslaved and murdered. Hundreds were rounded up and shipped to Europe to be sold; many died en route. For the rest of the population, Columbus demanded that all Taino under his control should bring the Spaniards gold. Those that didn’t were to have their hands cut off. Since there was, in fact, little gold to be had, the Taino fled, and the Spaniards hunted them down and killed them. The Taino tried to mount a resistance, but the Spanish weaponry was superior, and European diseases ravaged their population. In despair, the Taino engaged in mass suicide, even killing their own children to save them from the Spaniards. Within two years, half of what may have been 250,000 Taino were dead. The remainder were taken as slaves and set to work on plantations, where the mortality rate was very high. By 1550, 60 years after Columbus landed, only a few hundred Taino were left on their island. In another hundred years, perhaps only a handful remained”

    An entry in his journal from September 1498 reads, “From here one might send, in the name of the Holy Trinity, as many slaves as could be sold…” Indeed, as a fierce supporter of slavery, Columbus ultimately refused to baptize the native people of Hispanolia, since Catholic law forbade the enslavement of Christians.

    The Court appointed Francisco de Bobadilla, a member of the Order of Calatrava; however, his authority stretched far beyond what Columbus had requested. Bobadilla was given total control as governor from 1500 until his death in 1502. Arriving in Santo Domingo while Columbus was away, Bobadilla was immediately peppered with complaints about all three Columbus brothers: Christopher, Bartolomé, and Diego. Consuelo Varela, a Spanish historian, states: “Even those who loved him [Columbus] had to admit the atrocities that had taken place.”[32][33]

    As a result of these testimonies and without being allowed a word in his own defense, Columbus upon his return, had manacles placed on his arms and chains on his feet and was cast into prison to await return to Spain. He was 53 years old.

    According to testimony of 23 witnesses during his trial, Columbus regularly used barbaric acts of torture to govern Hispaniola

    He decreed that every Indian over fourteen years of age inhabiting the two large areas of Cibao and Vega Real, where gold had been found along the riverbeds, must pay tribute every three months of enough gold dust or grains to fill a hollow cascabel (hawksbell). Those living some distance from the sources of gold would be allowed to substitute an arroba (about twenty-five pounds) of cotton.

    To ensure compliance with the order Columbus devised a metal disk to be hung around the neck of each native, showing whether he was up to date with the tribute. Those in arrears were punished [their hands were chopped off and left to bleed to death to be accurate]; any who rebelled or tried to flee were hunted down and sold into slavery in Castile.

    Morison continues: “So the policy and acts of Columbus for which he alone was responsible began the depopulation of the terrestrial paradise that was Hispaniola in 1492. Of the original natives, estimated by modern ethnologist at 300,000 in number, one-third were killed off between 1494 and 1496. By 1508, an enumeration showed only 60,000 alive…in 1548 Oviedo [the official Spanish historian of conquest] doubted whether 500 Indians remained.

    … .What the Spaniards did to the Indians is told in horrifying detail by [Dominican Priest] Bartolome de las Casas, whose writing give the most thorough account of the Spanish-Indian encounter… . [He] saw soldier stabbing Indians for sport, dashing babies’ heads on rocks. And when the Indians resisted, the Spaniards hunted them down, equipped for killings with horses, armor plate, lances, pikes, rifles, crossbows, and vicious dogs. Indians who took things belonging to Spaniards–they were not accustomed to the concept of private ownership and gave freely of their own possessions–were beheaded, or burned at the stake.

    But although many Indians died from forced labor, starvation or outright murder, Zinn notes that the majority were killed by diseases to which they had no immunity, such as smallpox and typhoid fever. Personally, whether or not Columbus deliberately intended to kill the people of Hispaniola with smallpox seems somewhat irrelevant in view of his general conduct, as I don’t feel any more inclined to celebrate the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Indians just because not all of them were intentional.

    Further, even if Columbus didn’t deliberately use smallpox as a weapon against the Indians, others who followed him in his colonization of the “New World” certainly didn’t hesitate to. For example, the town of Amherst, Massachusetts is named for the Lord Jeffrey Amherst, who is believed to have deliberately given smallpox-infected blankets to Indians as an early form of germ warfare (see documentation) during the French-Indian War.

  38. JohnDoe

    On March 26, 2009 at 12:45 pm


    lol these comments are so funny

  39. no name

    On April 13, 2009 at 3:21 pm


    wtf

  40. no name

    On April 13, 2009 at 3:24 pm


    people, who the f cares?? jesus christ wow get a life this whole article just wasted 20 minutes of my life tht im nat gettin back

  41. tired of injustice

    On July 10, 2009 at 12:54 am


    its funny how people rationalize people who are evilsimply because they idetify with them racially

  42. Tuthankhamun

    On September 20, 2009 at 6:11 am


    I don’t think that it is very nice to say that just because Columbus was pretty horrid that every spanish person is evil. Think before you speak.

  43. kate

    On September 29, 2009 at 5:51 pm


    to the few not all idiots that commented above, why hate spain? christopher columbus was italian! DUH! but thats no reason to hate italy either, think of the times this was happening in. It was full of violence. Yes what he did was wrong, and is horrible to thin about today, but back then it wasn’t as bad.

  44. Buster Toby

    On November 19, 2009 at 7:40 pm


    Christopher Columbus’ expedition and exploration of the new world greatly change the Natives of the lands he explored. That change included a loss of religion, death, and exchange. This is known as the Columbus Effect.
    One of Columbus’ biggest objectives during his expedition was to convert the natives he found to Christianity. Instead of allowing them to decide, he forced them to change their religious views.
    This biggest attribute that Columbus’ voyage brought was death. Diseases like smallpox, measles, and influenza basically wiped out all of the Native American population. One of Columbus’ objectives during his voyage was to discover gold and riches. The Indians were forced to gather gold in order to fund Columbus’ voyage. If the Indians did not find enough gold, their hands would be chopped and they would bleed to death. Indians became very frightened at Columbus. Thus, many ran and tried to hide from his men. But they were eventually hunted down. Once captured, they would be attacked by dogs and or burned alive. Columbus’ also captured Indians for information on the sources of gold in the surrounding areas.
    Columbus did not find enough gold on his voyage to satisfy his wants and desires or to pay for his voyage. So he had to find an alternative way to make a profit. Indians are agile, great swimmers, and very strong and he figured they would make great servants. With that in mind, Columbus treated the Indians just the opposite of how they treated him. At first, they showed him great hospitality, traded everything they owned, and were very generous with sharing. The Indians would never say no. Columbus led a complete betrayal on the people that accepted him with open arms. Columbus rewarded the Indians with death and slavery. He started one of the most inhuman practices in history. Columbus opened the Atlantic Slave Trade where the Indians were taken to Europe. Many of the Indians died on the trip due to unfit conditions. Once they died, they were thrown overboard in the Atlantic. Columbus tore children from their parents, and husbands from wives. Columbus once said, “Let us in the name of the Holy Trinity go on sending all the slaves that can be sold.”
    Columbus was still not convinced that there was no abundant amount of gold where he had landed. He made Husbands and men work in mines to find gold. Once an Indian went into a mine, he normally did not come out. Columbus also made the wives work on mining. Indians were also forced to work on plantations. The Indians were treated so badly and malnutrition that there was an exponential decrease in the Indian population. Many of the Indians starved to death. Children died from a lack of milk produced from their mothers. Many Indians committed large mass suicides so that they would not have to endure the pain of being slaves. Women also had abortions so that their children would not have to go into slavery under Spanish rule. Indians were worked to death to try to satisfy the greed of one person. This becomes the start of the world’s most horrendous human tragedy. A Genocide.
    Columbus showed that there were new territories to be exploited whether it is for gold and for slaves. He came for artifacts, metals and human beings for slaves in the slave trade. Since Indians were treated so badly once discovered, it did not simply end there. It became the start of what is known as discrimination today. Today American Indians lack adequate healthcare and housing, receive pitiful education, face daunting barriers to economic opportunity, and see their lands overrun with pollution and big business. Indians proudly support a country that has given them so little, yet taken so much from them.
    Columbus opened a door to European invasions of the Americas. After a few years, many tribes dwindled down to nothing and became history. Many massacres occurred, for example, within four years of Columbus’ arrival on Hispaniola, his men killed or exported one third of the original population of three hundred thousand. When Europeans came to the New World, they would hunt Indians for sport and profit. Europeans would beat, rape, torture, kill, and behead the Indians. They went to the extent of cutting Indians to test the sharpness of their blades. Once dead, the Indians bodies were sometimes used for food for the dogs. They would also shoot Indians for target practice. Later Europeans also decimated the Indians main food supply, the buffalo.
    Now, I have to wonder why we still celebrate a holiday, Columbus Day, on October 12th. Christopher Columbus was not the first European to discover America. Vikings had arrived earlier and Indians also came over across the Bering Strait. Columbus was not as intellectual as one may guess. For one, he did not prove that the world was round. Educated people of that day had already discovered that. Educated people had also discovered that the world was larger than first imagined. People knew that man could said around the world without falling off of the edge. So why did Columbus think that he reached India when he was actually only a fourth of the way to India? They knew that a person could sail west to get east. People neglect to say that Columbus was the starter of a genocide against the whole Native American people. Columbus opened the Atlantic slave trade and launched one of the greatest waves of genocide known in history. Yet he is one of only two men with federal holidays bearing their names.

  45. Dr.Hamdan

    On January 30, 2010 at 3:25 am


    Columbus was evil and the United States loves him since they learned how to exterminate the natives in the Americas.

  46. shourtyboo

    On September 28, 2010 at 8:11 pm


    idgaf………about that he was send by the queen and king of spain………

  47. Stephanieee:P

    On October 11, 2010 at 6:48 pm


    You cant say that all Spanish people are evil and they think they’re everything,because not all of them are like that.
    I’m Spanish and i don’t think I’m the best person ever and people have to kneel b4 me !
    so think b4 you speak!!!

  48. chicken

    On October 11, 2010 at 8:54 pm


    wasnt christopher columbus italian??? whats all this crap about spain

  49. chicken

    On October 11, 2010 at 8:56 pm


    btw does anyone know any other crimes chris commited or is genocide the only one??? i have to do a project about this -_____-

  50. Mungo

    On October 11, 2010 at 9:28 pm


    Let’s see, the Aztecs conquered and enslaved their neighbors, used them as human sacrifice. The Incas did the same thing.

    Does anybody complain about that ?

    Julius Caesar invaded Gaul, killed one million people and enslaved another million.Romans used children as sex slaves too.

    Those are just a few examples.

    Who is protesting for all those poor people ? Or rather, what is so special about Columbus ?

  51. Mungo

    On October 11, 2010 at 9:29 pm


    Let\’s see, the Aztecs conquered and enslaved their neighbors, used them as human sacrifice. The Incas did the same thing.

    Does anybody complain about that ?

    Julius Caesar invaded Gaul, killed one million people and enslaved another million.Romans used children as sex slaves too.

    Those are just a few examples.

    Who is protesting for all those poor people ? Or rather, what is so special about Columbus ?

  52. Doug

    On October 12, 2010 at 7:36 pm


    Where did you get this? What is your source? Googling it, you are the only one on the entire Internet that has that.

    “The fugitives in the mountains were hunted down with hounds”

  53. Insani

    On October 13, 2010 at 1:20 am


    @Doug He probably rephrased it so that it wouldn’t be a complete copy of a source…

    @EdRoberts (I know this is an old comment, but…)

    Americans were also bad for the Indians. Ever heard about how they abused and stole Native American land? Not as bad, but still.

  54. jessica

    On October 13, 2010 at 4:05 pm


    Increased Indian warfare

    Though we do not usually think of Native Americans and “The New World” as part of medieval times, it must be remembered people have been living in the Americas for 15000 years.

    Native Americans (American Indians, Amerindians, Ameren’s, Indians, Injuns, or Red Indians) are indigenous peoples, who lived in the Americas prior to the European colonization; some of these ethnic groups still exist. The name “Indians” was bestowed by Christopher Columbus, who mistakenly believed that the places he found them were among the islands to the southeast of Asia known to Europeans as the Indies. (See further discussion below).

    Canadians now generally use the term First Nations to refer to Native Americans. In Alaska, because of legal use in the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANSCA) and because of the presence of the Inuit, Yupik, and Aleut peoples, the term Alaskan Native predominates. (See further discussion below.)

    Native Americans officially make up the majority of the population in Bolivia, Peru and Guatemala and are significant in most other former Spanish colonies, with the exception of Costa Rica, Cuba, Argentina, Dominican Republic and Uruguay.

    History

    The Native Americans are widely believed to have come to the Americas via the prehistoric Bering Land Bridge. However, this is not the only theory. Some archaeologists believe that the migration consisted of seafaring tribes that moved along the coast, avoiding mountainous inland terrain and highly variable terrestrial ecosystems. Other researchers have postulated an original settlement by skilled navigators from Oceania, though these American Aborigine people are believed to be nearly extinct. Yet another theory claims an early crossing of the Atlantic Ocean by people originating in Europe. Many native peoples do not believe the migration theory at all. The creation stories of many tribes place the people in North America from the beginning of time. Mormon tradition holds that the Native Americans represent one of the lost tribes of Israel.

    Based on anthropological evidence, at least three distinct migrations from Siberia occurred. The first wave of migration came into a land populated by the large mammals of the late Pleistocene epoch, including mammoths, horses, giant sloths, and wooly rhinoceroses. The Clovis culture provides one example of such immigrants. Later the Folsom culture developed, based on the hunting of bison.

    The second immigration wave comprised the Athabascan people, including the ancestors of the Apaches and Navajos; the third wave consisted of the Inuits, the Yupiks, and the Aleuts, who may have come by sea over the Bering Strait. The Athabascan peoples generally lived in Alaska and western Canada but some Athabascans migrated south as far as California and the American Southwest, and became the ancestors of tribes now there.

    The descendants of the third wave are so ethnically distinct from the remainder of the indigenous inhabitants of the Americas that they are not usually included in the terms “American Indian” or “First Nations”.

    In recent years, anthropological evidence of migration has been supplemented by studies based on molecular genetics. The provisional results from this field suggest that four distinct migrations from Asia occurred; and, most surprisingly, provide evidence of smaller-scale, contemporaneous human migration from Europe. This suggests that the migrant population, living in Europe at the time of the most recent ice age, adopted a life-style resembling that lived by Inuits and Yupiks in recent centuries.

    In the Mississippi valley of the United States, in Mexico and Central America, and in the Andes of South America Native American civilizations arose with farming cultures and city-states.

    The Arrival of Europeans

    The European colonization of the Americas forever changed the lives and cultures of the Native Americans. In the 15th to 19th centuries, their populations were decimated, by the privations of displacement, by disease, and in many cases by warfare with European groups and enslavement by them. The first Native American group encountered by Columbus, the 250,000 Arawaks of Haiti, were violently enslaved. Only 500 survived by the year 1550, and the group was totally extinct before 1650. Over the next 400 years, the experiences of other Native Americans with Europeans would not always amount to genocide, but they would typically be disastrous for the Native Americans.

    In the 15th century Spaniards and other Europeans brought horses to the Americas. Some of these animals escaped their owners and began to breed and increase their numbers in the wild. Ironically, the horse had originally evolved in the Americas, but the last American horses died out at the end of the last ice age. The re-introduction of the horse, however, had a profound impact on Native American cultures in the Great Plains of North America. This new mode of travel made it possible for some tribes to greatly expand their territories, exchange goods with neighboring tribes and to more easily capture game.

    Europeans also brought diseases against which the Native Americans had no immunity. Sometimes they did this intentionally, but often it was unintentional. Ailments such as chicken pox and measles, though common and rarely fatal among Europeans, often proved fatal to Native Americans. More deadly diseases such as smallpox were especially deadly to Native American populations. It is difficult to estimate the percentage of the total Native American population killed by these diseases, since waves of disease oftentimes preceded White scouts and often destroyed entire villages. Some historians have argued that more than 80% of some Indian populations may have died due to European-derived diseases.

    The first reported case of white men scalping Native Americans took place in New Hampshire colony on February 20, 1725, though it is thought that Indians learned scalping from Americans who, at times, collected them for bounties.

    Four Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy sided with the British and the Tories of the American Revolutionary War. The colonists were especially outraged at the Wyoming Massacre and the Cherry Valley Massacre, which occurred in 1788. In 1799 Congress sent Major General John Sullivan on what has become known as the Sullivan Expedition to neutralize the Iroquois threat to the American side. The two allied nations were rewarded, at least temporarily by keeping title to their lands after the Revolution. The title was later purchased very cheaply by Massachusetts and sold off in the Phelps and Gorham Purchase and the Holland Purchase, after which by treaty, it became a part of New York State. The tribes were moved to reservations or sent westward. Part of the Cayuga Nation was granted a reservation in British Canada See also History of New York.

    In the 19th century the United States forced Native Americans onto marginal lands in areas farther and farther west as white settlement of the young nation expanded in that direction. Numerous Indian Wars broke out between US forces and many different tribes. Authorities drafted countless treaties during this period and then later nullified them for various reasons. Well-known battles include the untypical Native American victory at the Battle of Little Bighorn in 1876, and the massacre of Native Americans at Wounded Knee in 1890. On January 31, 1876 the United States government ordered all Native Americans to move into reservations or reserves. This spelled the end of the Prairie Culture that developed around the use of the horse for hunting, travel and trading.

    American policy toward Native Americans has been an evolving process. In the late nineteenth century reformers in efforts to civilize Indians adapted the practice of educating native children in boarding schools. The experience in the boarding schools which existed from 1875 to 1928 was difficult for Indian children who were forbidden to speak their native languages and in numerous other ways forced to adopt white cultural practices.

    Military defeat, cultural pressure, confinement on reservations, forced cultural assimilation, the outlawing of native languages and culture, forced sterilizations, termination policies of the 50’s and 60’s, and (especially) slavery have had deleterious effects on Native Americans’ mental and ultimately physical health. Contemporary problems include poverty, alcoholism, heart disease, and diabetes.

    What name best identifies this group of people?

    The term “Native American” originated with anthropologists who preferred it to the former appellations of “Indian” or “American Indian”, which they considered inaccurate, as these terms bear no relationship to the actual origins of Aboriginal Americans (or American Aborigines), and were born of the misapprehension on the part of Christopher Columbus, arriving at islands off the east coast of the North American continent, that he had reached the East Indies. The words “Indian” and “American Indian” continue in widespread use in North America, even amongst Native Americans themselves, many of whom do not feel offended by the terms.[1] But the appropriateness of this usage has become controversial since the late 20th century; many feel the “Indian” term undesirable as symbolic of the domination of these peoples by the European colonists. Others, in turn, resent criticism of their traditional way of speaking. “Red Indian” is a common British term, useful in differentiating this group from a distinct group of people referred to as East Indians.

    One minority view has advocated the name “Asiatic Americans” as a more accurate term because of the popular theory that such peoples migrated to the Americas from Asia across an ice bridge covering the Bering Straits some 20,000 years ago. Competent fossil evidence supports the case for such a migration. However, this term is considered offensive by many American Indians because most native religions state that American Indians have been in the Western Hemisphere since the dawn of time. Furthermore, the strong tradition among archaeologists and anthropologists, is to indicate the geographic origins of a people as relating to the region where researchers first encountered them or their remains.

    One difficulty with the term “Native American” as a substitute for “American Indian” lies in the fact that there exist several groups of people indisputably indigenous to the Americas, but who fall outside the classification of “American Indians”, for example the Innu people of the Labrador/Quebec peninsula and the Inuit, Yupik, and Aleut peoples of the far north of the continent. Another argument is that any person born in America is native to it.

    Another difficulty is that many Native American groups migrated (or were displaced) to their current locations after the start of European colonization, and therefore it can be argued that they have no more “native” ties to their current locations than do the Europeans. However, as they were moving within America, they remained native to the America.

    The term “Native American” is woefully inadequate from a scientific viewpoint, as Homo sapiens is an invasive species in the Americas. From a legal standpoint, however, any person born in the Americas is a native American (though not Native American).

    Killed Native Americans because of Greed
    Yes he did. He killed a huge percentage of Arawak people in what is know known as the Bahamas. He started a genocide and was a murderer.
    he and his men also killed off the entire taino tribe. Columbus brought back Natives after his first voyage to show what he had found, there is no approximate number of how many people he killed, maybe not by himself… but because of him they died. I would say over 10 thousand, at least. Christopher Columbus was a terrible man. He only came to our country for gold, he killed so many native Americans who were innocent and he also brought many new diseases to the “new world”. Many people are surprised to learn that Christopher Columbus and his men enslaved native inhabitants of the West Indies, forced them to convert to Christianity, and subdued them with violence in an effort to seek riches. For readers who are skeptical or wish to learn more, this page contains information that can be confirmed by consulting the sources cited. After reading this page, please also see Examining the Reputation of Columbus.
    In Pursuit of Profits
    On April 17, 1492, before his first voyage to the Americas, Columbus negotiated a business contract with King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain, entitling him to 10% of all profits. In this contract, the Spanish sovereigns agreed:
    “that of all and every kind of merchandise, whether pearls, precious stones, gold, silver, spices, and other objects and merchandise whatsoever, of whatever kind, name and sort, which may be bought, bartered, discovered, acquired and obtained within the limits of the said Admiralty, Your Highnesses grant from now henceforth to the said Don Crist�bal [Christopher Columbus] … the tenth part of the whole, after deducting all the expenses which may be incurred therein.” [1]
    After his fourth and final voyage to the Americas, Columbus summed up his feelings about gold in a July 7, 1503, letter to Ferdinand and Isabella: “Gold is most excellent; gold is treasure, and he who possesses it does all he wishes to in this world.” [2]
    After Turning Out the Jews
    Beyond profits, Columbus sought to convert native people to Catholicism. In the prologue to his journal of the first voyage, Columbus wrote to Ferdinand and Isabella:
    “YOUR HIGHNESSES, as Catholic Christians and Princes who love the holy Christian faith, and the propagation of it, and who are enemies to the sect of Mahoma [Islam] and to all idolatries and heresies, resolved to send me, Crist�bal Colon, to the said parts of India to see the said princes … with a view that they might be converted to our holy faith …. Thus, after having turned out all the Jews from all your kingdoms and lordships … your Highnesses gave orders to me that with a sufficient fleet I should go to the said parts of India …. I shall forget sleep, and shall work at the business of navigation, so that the service is performed.” [3]
    The Enslavement of Native People
    On October 12, 1492 (the first day he encountered the native people of the Americas), Columbus wrote in his journal: “They should be good servants …. I, our Lord being pleased, will take hence, at the time of my departure, six natives for your Highnesses.” These captives were later paraded through the streets of Barcelona and Seville when Columbus returned to Spain. [4]

    From his very first contact with native people, Columbus had their domination in mind. For example, on October 14, 1492, Columbus wrote in his journal, “with fifty men they can all be subjugated and made to do what is required of them.” [5] These were not mere words: after his second voyage, Columbus sent back a consignment of natives to be sold as slaves. [6]

    Yet in an April, 1493, letter to Luis de Santangel (a patron who helped fund the first voyage), Columbus made clear that the people he encountered had doe nnothing to deserve ill treatment. According to Columbus:
    “they are artless and generous with what they have, to such a degree as no one would believe but him who had seen it. Of anything they have, if it be asked for, they never say no, but do rather invite the person to accept it, and show as much lovingness as though they would give their hearts.” [7]
    Nonetheless, later in the letter Columbus went on to say:
    “their Highnesses may see that I shall give them as much gold as they need …. and slaves as many as they shall order to be shipped.” [8]
    Pope Gives the Americas to Spain
    Following Columbus’ discovery, Pope Alexander VI issued a May 4, 1493, papal bull granting official ownership of the New World to Ferdinand and Isabella. To these monarchs, the Pope declared:
    “We of our own motion, and not at your solicitation, do give, concede, and assign for ever to you and your successors, all the islands, and main lands, discovered; and which may hereafter, be discovered, towards the west and south; whether they be situated towards India, or towards any other part whatsoever, and give you absolute power in them.” [9]
    This decree did not go unchallenged. Francis I of France, for example, later quipped: “The sun shines on me as well as on others. I should be very happy to see the clause in Adam’s will which excluded me from my share when the world was being divided.” [10]

    Nonetheless, the Pope’s declaration ultimately had dire consequences for native inhabitants of the Americas. Beginning in 1514 Spanish conquerors adopted “the Requirement,” an ultimatum in which Indians were forced to accept “the Church as the Ruler and Superior of the whole world” or face persecution. If Indians did not immediately comply, the Requirement warned them:
    “We shall take you and your wives and your children, and shall make slaves of them, and as such shall sell and dispose of them as their Highnesses may command; and we shall take away your goods, and shall do all the harm and damage that we can.” [11]
    Often the Requirement was read to Indians without translation, or in some cases even from ships before crew members landed to kill Indians and take slaves. [12]

    In between notes:Once again, it’s time to celebrate Columbus Day. Yet, the stunning truth is: If Christopher Columbus were alive today, he would be put on trial for crimes against humanity. Columbus’ reign of terror, as documented by noted historians, was so bloody, his legacy so unspeakably cruel, that Columbus makes a modern villain like Saddam Hussein look like a pale codfish.
    Question: Why do we honor a man who, if he were alive today, would almost certainly be sitting on Death Row awaiting execution?
    If you’d like to know the true story about Christopher Columbus, please read on. But I warn you, it’s not for the faint of heart.
    Here’s the basics. On the second Monday in October each year, we celebrate Columbus Day (this year, it’s on October 11th). We teach our school kids a cute little song that goes: “In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue.” It’s an American tradition, as American as pizza pie. Or is it? Surprisingly, the true story of Christopher Columbus has very little in common with the myth we all learned in school.
    Columbus Day, as we know it in the United States, was invented by the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic fraternal service organization. Back in the 1930s, they were looking for a Catholic hero as a role-model their kids could look up to. In 1934, as a result of lobbying by the Knights of Columbus, Congress and President Franklin Roosevelt signed Columbus Day into law as a federal holiday to honor this courageous explorer. Or so we thought.
    There are several problems with this. First of all, Columbus wasn’t the first European to discover America. As we all know, the Viking, Leif Ericson probably founded a Norse village on Newfoundland some 500 years earlier. So, hat’s off to Leif. But if you think about it, the whole concept of discovering America is, well, arrogant. After all, the Native Americans discovered North America about 14,000 years before Columbus was even born! Surprisingly, DNA evidence now suggests that courageous Polynesian adventurers sailed dugout canoes across the Pacific and settled in South America long before the Vikings.
    Second, Columbus wasn’t a hero. When he set foot on that sandy beach in the Bahamas on October 12, 1492, Columbus discovered that the islands were inhabited by friendly, peaceful people called the Lucayans, Taínos and Arawaks. Writing in his diary, Columbus said they were a handsome, smart and kind people. He noted that the gentle Arawaks were remarkable for their hospitality. “They offered to share with anyone and when you ask for something, they never say no,” he said. The Arawaks had no weapons; their society had neither criminals, prisons nor prisoners. They were so kind-hearted that Columbus noted in his diary that on the day the Santa Maria was shipwrecked, the Arawaks labored for hours to save his crew and cargo. The native people were so honest that not one thing was missing.
    Columbus was so impressed with the hard work of these gentle islanders, that he immediately seized their land for Spain and enslaved them to work in his brutal gold mines. Within only two years, 125,000 (half of the population) of the original natives on the island were dead.
    If I were a Native American, I would mark October 12, 1492, as a black day on my calendar.
    Shockingly, Columbus supervised the selling of native girls into sexual slavery. Young girls of the ages 9 to 10 were the most desired by his men. In 1500, Columbus casually wrote about it in his log. He said: “A hundred castellanoes are as easily obtained for a woman as for a farm, and it is very general and there are plenty of dealers who go about looking for girls; those from nine to ten are now in demand.”
    He forced these peaceful natives work in his gold mines until they died of exhaustion. If an “Indian” worker did not deliver his full quota of gold dust by Columbus’ deadline, soldiers would cut off the man’s hands and tie them around his neck to send a message. Slavery was so intolerable for these sweet, gentle island people that at one point, 100 of them committed mass suicide. Catholic law forbade the enslavement of Christians, but Columbus solved this problem. He simply refused to baptize the native people of Hispaniola.
    On his second trip to the New World, Columbus brought cannons and attack dogs. If a native resisted slavery, he would cut off a nose or an ear. If slaves tried to escape, Columbus had them burned alive. Other times, he sent attack dogs to hunt them down, and the dogs would tear off the arms and legs of the screaming natives while they were still alive. If the Spaniards ran short of meat to feed the dogs, Arawak babies were killed for dog food.
    Columbus’ acts of cruelty were so unspeakable and so legendary – even in his own day – that Governor Francisco De Bobadilla arrested Columbus and his two brothers, slapped them into chains, and shipped them off to Spain to answer for their crimes against the Arawaks. But the King and Queen of Spain, their treasury filling up with gold, pardoned Columbus and let him go free.
    One of Columbus’ men, Bartolome De Las Casas, was so mortified by Columbus’ brutal atrocities against the native peoples, that he quit working for Columbus and became a Catholic priest. He described how the Spaniards under Columbus’ command cut off the legs of children who ran from them, to test the sharpness of their blades. According to De Las Casas, the men made bets as to who, with one sweep of his sword, could cut a person in half. He says that Columbus’ men poured people full of boiling soap. In a single day, De Las Casas was an eye witness as the Spanish soldiers dismembered, beheaded, or raped 3000 native people. “Such inhumanities and barbarisms were committed in my sight as no age can parallel,” De Las Casas wrote. “My eyes have seen these acts so foreign to human nature that now I tremble as I write.”
    De Las Casas spent the rest of his life trying to protect the helpless native people. But after a while, there were no more natives to protect. Experts generally agree that before 1492, the population on the island of Hispaniola probably numbered above 3 million. Within 20 years of Spanish arrival, it was reduced to only 60,000. Within 50 years, not a single original native inhabitant could be found.
    In 1516, Spanish historian Peter Martyr wrote: “… a ship without compass, chart, or guide, but only following the trail of dead Indians who had been thrown from the ships could find its way from the Bahamas to Hispaniola.”
    Christopher Columbus derived most of his income from slavery, De Las Casas noted. In fact, Columbus was the first slave trader in the Americas. As the native slaves died off, they were replaced with black slaves. Columbus’ son became the first African slave trader in 1505.
    Are you surprised you never learned about any of this in school? I am too. Why do we have this extraordinary gap in our American ethos? Columbus himself kept detailed diaries, as did some of his men including De Las Casas and Michele de Cuneo. (If you don’t believe me, just Google the words Columbus, sex slave, and gold mine.)
    Columbus’ reign of terror is one of the darkest chapters in our history. The REAL question is: Why do we celebrate a holiday in honor of this man? (Take three deep breaths. If you’re like me, your stomach is heaving at this point. I’m sorry. Sometimes the truth hurts. That said, I’d like to turn in a more positive direction.)
    Call me crazy, but I think holidays ought to honor people who are worthy of our admiration, true heroes who are positive role models for our children. If we’re looking for heroes we can truly admire, I’d like to offer a few candidates. Foremost among them are school kids.
    Let me tell you about some school kids who are changing the world. I think they are worthy of a holiday. My friend Nan Peterson is the director of the Blake School, a K-12 school in Minnesota. She recently visited Kenya. Nan says there are 33 million people in Kenya… and 11 million of them are orphans! Can you imagine that? She went to Kibera, the slum outside Nairobi, and a boy walked up to her and handed her a baby. He said: My father died. My mother died… and I’m not feeling so good myself. Here, take my sister. If I die, they will throw her into the street to die.
    There are so many orphans in Kenya, the baby girls are throwaways!
    Nan visited an orphanage for girls. The girls were starving to death. They had one old cow that only gave one cup of milk a day. So each girl only got ONE TEASPOON of milk a day!
    After this heartbreaking experience, Nan went home to her school in Minnesota and asked the kids… what can we do? The kids got the idea to make homemade paper and sell it to buy a cow. So they made a bunch of paper, and sold the paper, and when they were done they had enough money to buy… FOUR COWS! And enough food to feed all of the cows for ONE FULL YEAR! These are kids… from 6 years old to 18… saving the lives of kids halfway around the world. And I thought: If a 6-year-old could do that… what could I do?
    At Casady School in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, seemingly “average” school kids raised $20,000 to dig clean water wells for children in Ethiopia. These kids are heroes. Why don’t we celebrate “Kids Who Are Changing the Planet” Day?
    Let me ask you a question: Would we celebrate Columbus Day if the story of Christopher Columbus were told from the point-of-view of his victims? No way!
    The truth about Columbus is going to be a hard pill for some folks to swallow. Please, don’t think I’m picking on Catholics. All the Catholics I know are wonderful people. I don’t want to take away their holiday or their hero. But if we’re looking for a Catholic our kids can admire, the Catholic church has many, many amazing people we could name a holiday after. How about Mother Teresa day? Or St. Francis of Assisi day? Or Betty Williams day (another Catholic Nobel Peace Prize winner). These men and women are truly heroes of peace, not just for Catholics, but for all of us.
    Let’s come clean. Let’s tell the truth about Christopher Columbus. Let’s boycott this outrageous holiday because it honors a mass murderer. If we skip the cute song about “In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue,” I don’t think our first graders will miss it much, do you? True, Columbus’ brutal treatment of peaceful Native Americans was so horrific… maybe we should hide the truth about Columbus until our kids reach at least High School age. Let’s teach it to them about the same time we tell them about the Nazi death camps.
    While we’re at it, let’s rewrite our history books. From now on, instead of glorifying the exploits of mass murderers like Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, Genghis Khan, and Napoleon Bonaparte, let’s teach our kids about true heroes, men and women of courage and kindness who devoted their lives to the good of others. There’s a long list, starting with Florence Nightingale, Mahatma Gandhi, Rev. Martin Luther King, and John F. Kennedy.
    These people were not adventurers who “discovered” an island in the Caribbean. They were noble souls who discovered what is best in the human spirit.
    Why don’t we create a holiday to replace Columbus Day?
    Let’s call it Heroes of Peace Day.

    Sold native Americans into slavery
    I think that Columbus is guilty of genocide. I believe this because in his own journal he wrote about how easy the natives do what they want them to, and how they would make good slaves “They have no weapons and are all naked without any skill in arms and are very cowardly so that a thousand would not challenge three,” says the journal for December 16th “… Thus they are useful to be commanded and to be made to labor and sow and to do everything else of which there is need and build towns and be taught to wear clothes and learn our customs.” I think Columbus along with the people who came with him were guilty of genocide.
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    ads by adMarketplace I believe this because he followed the steps to commit genocide. First the group was already divided into colonists and natives. Then the Natives were dehumanized and treated like animals. “Then Columbus made a plan to capture the natives and send them to Europe to work as slaves. Next most of the Natives were slain either by the hands of their captors, their own hands, or from overwork, or they were captured as slaves. “The fugitives in the mountains were hunted down with hounds; if they escaped capture, they often died of disease or starvation. Thousands killed themselves by taking a poison made from cassava. Many parents killed their infants to spare them a living death under Spanish rule. In only two years, half the 250,000 Indians on the island were dead… it was the beginning of genocide for the native population. By 1548…not 500 Indians remained in Hispaniola” And finally today people deny that Columbus is guilty of Genocide. Saying that he was a great man who discovered the new world and neglect to say that he was also the starter of genocide against the whole Native American people.
    Read more in History
    « The Wives of Henry VIII
    German Immigration »
    Christopher Columbus started out to find a new sea route to India and took with him three ships the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria. After about 5 weeks Land was sighted at 2 a.m. on October 12, 1492, by a sailor named Rodrigo de Triana, Columbus claimed they discovered a new land, he named it San Salvador. The land had already been discovered and was inhabited by many Native people. The native people he encountered were the Lucayan, Taíno or Arawak. They were a peaceful people who weren’t trying to hurt the Colonists. However the colonists didn’t have the same intentions. In Columbus’ journal he wrote about the natives. “It appears to me, that the people are ingenious, and would be good servants and I am of opinion that they would very readily become Christians, as they appear to have no religion.” Later in his journal he wrote, “I could conquer the whole of them with 50 men, and govern them as I pleased.” The Taínos were enslaved by the Spaniards and worked to death in the mines and plantations they established on Hispaniola. Columbus imposed a burdensome tribute on every Taíno, which if he failed to pay; he would suffer mutilation or execution. When Columbus was in “the new world” he did exploring near Cuba and Hispaniola. The Santa Maria ran aground and had to be abandoned. The local natives let Columbus leave some of his men behind. “Columbus left 39 men and founded the settlement of La Navidad in what is now present-day Haiti.” Later before returning to Spain Columbus decided that since the natives were so easy to control he’d take some back as slaves. “Columbus kidnapped some ten to twenty-five Indians and took them back with him. Only seven or eight of the Indians arrived in Spain alive, but they made quite an impression on Seville.” Columbus’ voyage back may also have brought syphilis back from the New World.

  55. jessica

    On October 13, 2010 at 4:08 pm


    Increased Indian warfare

    Though we do not usually think of Native Americans and \”The New World\” as part of medieval times, it must be remembered people have been living in the Americas for 15000 years.

    Native Americans (American Indians, Amerindians, Ameren’s, Indians, Injuns, or Red Indians) are indigenous peoples, who lived in the Americas prior to the European colonization; some of these ethnic groups still exist. The name \”Indians\” was bestowed by Christopher Columbus, who mistakenly believed that the places he found them were among the islands to the southeast of Asia known to Europeans as the Indies. (See further discussion below).

    Canadians now generally use the term First Nations to refer to Native Americans. In Alaska, because of legal use in the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANSCA) and because of the presence of the Inuit, Yupik, and Aleut peoples, the term Alaskan Native predominates. (See further discussion below.)

    Native Americans officially make up the majority of the population in Bolivia, Peru and Guatemala and are significant in most other former Spanish colonies, with the exception of Costa Rica, Cuba, Argentina, Dominican Republic and Uruguay.

    History

    The Native Americans are widely believed to have come to the Americas via the prehistoric Bering Land Bridge. However, this is not the only theory. Some archaeologists believe that the migration consisted of seafaring tribes that moved along the coast, avoiding mountainous inland terrain and highly variable terrestrial ecosystems. Other researchers have postulated an original settlement by skilled navigators from Oceania, though these American Aborigine people are believed to be nearly extinct. Yet another theory claims an early crossing of the Atlantic Ocean by people originating in Europe. Many native peoples do not believe the migration theory at all. The creation stories of many tribes place the people in North America from the beginning of time. Mormon tradition holds that the Native Americans represent one of the lost tribes of Israel.

    Based on anthropological evidence, at least three distinct migrations from Siberia occurred. The first wave of migration came into a land populated by the large mammals of the late Pleistocene epoch, including mammoths, horses, giant sloths, and wooly rhinoceroses. The Clovis culture provides one example of such immigrants. Later the Folsom culture developed, based on the hunting of bison.

    The second immigration wave comprised the Athabascan people, including the ancestors of the Apaches and Navajos; the third wave consisted of the Inuits, the Yupiks, and the Aleuts, who may have come by sea over the Bering Strait. The Athabascan peoples generally lived in Alaska and western Canada but some Athabascans migrated south as far as California and the American Southwest, and became the ancestors of tribes now there.

    The descendants of the third wave are so ethnically distinct from the remainder of the indigenous inhabitants of the Americas that they are not usually included in the terms \”American Indian\” or \”First Nations\”.

    In recent years, anthropological evidence of migration has been supplemented by studies based on molecular genetics. The provisional results from this field suggest that four distinct migrations from Asia occurred; and, most surprisingly, provide evidence of smaller-scale, contemporaneous human migration from Europe. This suggests that the migrant population, living in Europe at the time of the most recent ice age, adopted a life-style resembling that lived by Inuits and Yupiks in recent centuries.

    In the Mississippi valley of the United States, in Mexico and Central America, and in the Andes of South America Native American civilizations arose with farming cultures and city-states.

    The Arrival of Europeans

    The European colonization of the Americas forever changed the lives and cultures of the Native Americans. In the 15th to 19th centuries, their populations were decimated, by the privations of displacement, by disease, and in many cases by warfare with European groups and enslavement by them. The first Native American group encountered by Columbus, the 250,000 Arawaks of Haiti, were violently enslaved. Only 500 survived by the year 1550, and the group was totally extinct before 1650. Over the next 400 years, the experiences of other Native Americans with Europeans would not always amount to genocide, but they would typically be disastrous for the Native Americans.

    In the 15th century Spaniards and other Europeans brought horses to the Americas. Some of these animals escaped their owners and began to breed and increase their numbers in the wild. Ironically, the horse had originally evolved in the Americas, but the last American horses died out at the end of the last ice age. The re-introduction of the horse, however, had a profound impact on Native American cultures in the Great Plains of North America. This new mode of travel made it possible for some tribes to greatly expand their territories, exchange goods with neighboring tribes and to more easily capture game.

    Europeans also brought diseases against which the Native Americans had no immunity. Sometimes they did this intentionally, but often it was unintentional. Ailments such as chicken pox and measles, though common and rarely fatal among Europeans, often proved fatal to Native Americans. More deadly diseases such as smallpox were especially deadly to Native American populations. It is difficult to estimate the percentage of the total Native American population killed by these diseases, since waves of disease oftentimes preceded White scouts and often destroyed entire villages. Some historians have argued that more than 80% of some Indian populations may have died due to European-derived diseases.

    The first reported case of white men scalping Native Americans took place in New Hampshire colony on February 20, 1725, though it is thought that Indians learned scalping from Americans who, at times, collected them for bounties.

    Four Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy sided with the British and the Tories of the American Revolutionary War. The colonists were especially outraged at the Wyoming Massacre and the Cherry Valley Massacre, which occurred in 1788. In 1799 Congress sent Major General John Sullivan on what has become known as the Sullivan Expedition to neutralize the Iroquois threat to the American side. The two allied nations were rewarded, at least temporarily by keeping title to their lands after the Revolution. The title was later purchased very cheaply by Massachusetts and sold off in the Phelps and Gorham Purchase and the Holland Purchase, after which by treaty, it became a part of New York State. The tribes were moved to reservations or sent westward. Part of the Cayuga Nation was granted a reservation in British Canada See also History of New York.

    In the 19th century the United States forced Native Americans onto marginal lands in areas farther and farther west as white settlement of the young nation expanded in that direction. Numerous Indian Wars broke out between US forces and many different tribes. Authorities drafted countless treaties during this period and then later nullified them for various reasons. Well-known battles include the untypical Native American victory at the Battle of Little Bighorn in 1876, and the massacre of Native Americans at Wounded Knee in 1890. On January 31, 1876 the United States government ordered all Native Americans to move into reservations or reserves. This spelled the end of the Prairie Culture that developed around the use of the horse for hunting, travel and trading.

    American policy toward Native Americans has been an evolving process. In the late nineteenth century reformers in efforts to civilize Indians adapted the practice of educating native children in boarding schools. The experience in the boarding schools which existed from 1875 to 1928 was difficult for Indian children who were forbidden to speak their native languages and in numerous other ways forced to adopt white cultural practices.

    Military defeat, cultural pressure, confinement on reservations, forced cultural assimilation, the outlawing of native languages and culture, forced sterilizations, termination policies of the 50\’s and 60\’s, and (especially) slavery have had deleterious effects on Native Americans\’ mental and ultimately physical health. Contemporary problems include poverty, alcoholism, heart disease, and diabetes.

    What name best identifies this group of people?

    The term \”Native American\” originated with anthropologists who preferred it to the former appellations of \”Indian\” or \”American Indian\”, which they considered inaccurate, as these terms bear no relationship to the actual origins of Aboriginal Americans (or American Aborigines), and were born of the misapprehension on the part of Christopher Columbus, arriving at islands off the east coast of the North American continent, that he had reached the East Indies. The words \”Indian\” and \”American Indian\” continue in widespread use in North America, even amongst Native Americans themselves, many of whom do not feel offended by the terms.[1] But the appropriateness of this usage has become controversial since the late 20th century; many feel the \”Indian\” term undesirable as symbolic of the domination of these peoples by the European colonists. Others, in turn, resent criticism of their traditional way of speaking. \”Red Indian\” is a common British term, useful in differentiating this group from a distinct group of people referred to as East Indians.

    One minority view has advocated the name \”Asiatic Americans\” as a more accurate term because of the popular theory that such peoples migrated to the Americas from Asia across an ice bridge covering the Bering Straits some 20,000 years ago. Competent fossil evidence supports the case for such a migration. However, this term is considered offensive by many American Indians because most native religions state that American Indians have been in the Western Hemisphere since the dawn of time. Furthermore, the strong tradition among archaeologists and anthropologists, is to indicate the geographic origins of a people as relating to the region where researchers first encountered them or their remains.

    One difficulty with the term \”Native American\” as a substitute for \”American Indian\” lies in the fact that there exist several groups of people indisputably indigenous to the Americas, but who fall outside the classification of \”American Indians\”, for example the Innu people of the Labrador/Quebec peninsula and the Inuit, Yupik, and Aleut peoples of the far north of the continent. Another argument is that any person born in America is native to it.

    Another difficulty is that many Native American groups migrated (or were displaced) to their current locations after the start of European colonization, and therefore it can be argued that they have no more \”native\” ties to their current locations than do the Europeans. However, as they were moving within America, they remained native to the America.

    The term \”Native American\” is woefully inadequate from a scientific viewpoint, as Homo sapiens is an invasive species in the Americas. From a legal standpoint, however, any person born in the Americas is a native American (though not Native American).

    Killed Native Americans because of Greed
    Yes he did. He killed a huge percentage of Arawak people in what is know known as the Bahamas. He started a genocide and was a murderer.
    he and his men also killed off the entire taino tribe. Columbus brought back Natives after his first voyage to show what he had found, there is no approximate number of how many people he killed, maybe not by himself… but because of him they died. I would say over 10 thousand, at least. Christopher Columbus was a terrible man. He only came to our country for gold, he killed so many native Americans who were innocent and he also brought many new diseases to the \”new world\”. Many people are surprised to learn that Christopher Columbus and his men enslaved native inhabitants of the West Indies, forced them to convert to Christianity, and subdued them with violence in an effort to seek riches. For readers who are skeptical or wish to learn more, this page contains information that can be confirmed by consulting the sources cited. After reading this page, please also see Examining the Reputation of Columbus.
    In Pursuit of Profits
    On April 17, 1492, before his first voyage to the Americas, Columbus negotiated a business contract with King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain, entitling him to 10% of all profits. In this contract, the Spanish sovereigns agreed:
    \”that of all and every kind of merchandise, whether pearls, precious stones, gold, silver, spices, and other objects and merchandise whatsoever, of whatever kind, name and sort, which may be bought, bartered, discovered, acquired and obtained within the limits of the said Admiralty, Your Highnesses grant from now henceforth to the said Don Crist�bal [Christopher Columbus] … the tenth part of the whole, after deducting all the expenses which may be incurred therein.\” [1]
    After his fourth and final voyage to the Americas, Columbus summed up his feelings about gold in a July 7, 1503, letter to Ferdinand and Isabella: \”Gold is most excellent; gold is treasure, and he who possesses it does all he wishes to in this world.\” [2]
    After Turning Out the Jews
    Beyond profits, Columbus sought to convert native people to Catholicism. In the prologue to his journal of the first voyage, Columbus wrote to Ferdinand and Isabella:
    \”YOUR HIGHNESSES, as Catholic Christians and Princes who love the holy Christian faith, and the propagation of it, and who are enemies to the sect of Mahoma [Islam] and to all idolatries and heresies, resolved to send me, Crist�bal Colon, to the said parts of India to see the said princes … with a view that they might be converted to our holy faith …. Thus, after having turned out all the Jews from all your kingdoms and lordships … your Highnesses gave orders to me that with a sufficient fleet I should go to the said parts of India …. I shall forget sleep, and shall work at the business of navigation, so that the service is performed.\” [3]
    The Enslavement of Native People
    On October 12, 1492 (the first day he encountered the native people of the Americas), Columbus wrote in his journal: \”They should be good servants …. I, our Lord being pleased, will take hence, at the time of my departure, six natives for your Highnesses.\” These captives were later paraded through the streets of Barcelona and Seville when Columbus returned to Spain. [4]

    From his very first contact with native people, Columbus had their domination in mind. For example, on October 14, 1492, Columbus wrote in his journal, \”with fifty men they can all be subjugated and made to do what is required of them.\” [5] These were not mere words: after his second voyage, Columbus sent back a consignment of natives to be sold as slaves. [6]

    Yet in an April, 1493, letter to Luis de Santangel (a patron who helped fund the first voyage), Columbus made clear that the people he encountered had doe nnothing to deserve ill treatment. According to Columbus:
    \”they are artless and generous with what they have, to such a degree as no one would believe but him who had seen it. Of anything they have, if it be asked for, they never say no, but do rather invite the person to accept it, and show as much lovingness as though they would give their hearts.\” [7]
    Nonetheless, later in the letter Columbus went on to say:
    \”their Highnesses may see that I shall give them as much gold as they need …. and slaves as many as they shall order to be shipped.\” [8]
    Pope Gives the Americas to Spain
    Following Columbus\’ discovery, Pope Alexander VI issued a May 4, 1493, papal bull granting official ownership of the New World to Ferdinand and Isabella. To these monarchs, the Pope declared:
    \”We of our own motion, and not at your solicitation, do give, concede, and assign for ever to you and your successors, all the islands, and main lands, discovered; and which may hereafter, be discovered, towards the west and south; whether they be situated towards India, or towards any other part whatsoever, and give you absolute power in them.\” [9]
    This decree did not go unchallenged. Francis I of France, for example, later quipped: \”The sun shines on me as well as on others. I should be very happy to see the clause in Adam\’s will which excluded me from my share when the world was being divided.\” [10]

    Nonetheless, the Pope\’s declaration ultimately had dire consequences for native inhabitants of the Americas. Beginning in 1514 Spanish conquerors adopted \”the Requirement,\” an ultimatum in which Indians were forced to accept \”the Church as the Ruler and Superior of the whole world\” or face persecution. If Indians did not immediately comply, the Requirement warned them:
    \”We shall take you and your wives and your children, and shall make slaves of them, and as such shall sell and dispose of them as their Highnesses may command; and we shall take away your goods, and shall do all the harm and damage that we can.\” [11]
    Often the Requirement was read to Indians without translation, or in some cases even from ships before crew members landed to kill Indians and take slaves. [12]

    In between notes:Once again, it\’s time to celebrate Columbus Day. Yet, the stunning truth is: If Christopher Columbus were alive today, he would be put on trial for crimes against humanity. Columbus\’ reign of terror, as documented by noted historians, was so bloody, his legacy so unspeakably cruel, that Columbus makes a modern villain like Saddam Hussein look like a pale codfish.
    Question: Why do we honor a man who, if he were alive today, would almost certainly be sitting on Death Row awaiting execution?
    If you\’d like to know the true story about Christopher Columbus, please read on. But I warn you, it\’s not for the faint of heart.
    Here\’s the basics. On the second Monday in October each year, we celebrate Columbus Day (this year, it\’s on October 11th). We teach our school kids a cute little song that goes: \”In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue.\” It\’s an American tradition, as American as pizza pie. Or is it? Surprisingly, the true story of Christopher Columbus has very little in common with the myth we all learned in school.
    Columbus Day, as we know it in the United States, was invented by the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic fraternal service organization. Back in the 1930s, they were looking for a Catholic hero as a role-model their kids could look up to. In 1934, as a result of lobbying by the Knights of Columbus, Congress and President Franklin Roosevelt signed Columbus Day into law as a federal holiday to honor this courageous explorer. Or so we thought.
    There are several problems with this. First of all, Columbus wasn\’t the first European to discover America. As we all know, the Viking, Leif Ericson probably founded a Norse village on Newfoundland some 500 years earlier. So, hat\’s off to Leif. But if you think about it, the whole concept of discovering America is, well, arrogant. After all, the Native Americans discovered North America about 14,000 years before Columbus was even born! Surprisingly, DNA evidence now suggests that courageous Polynesian adventurers sailed dugout canoes across the Pacific and settled in South America long before the Vikings.
    Second, Columbus wasn\’t a hero. When he set foot on that sandy beach in the Bahamas on October 12, 1492, Columbus discovered that the islands were inhabited by friendly, peaceful people called the Lucayans, Taínos and Arawaks. Writing in his diary, Columbus said they were a handsome, smart and kind people. He noted that the gentle Arawaks were remarkable for their hospitality. \”They offered to share with anyone and when you ask for something, they never say no,\” he said. The Arawaks had no weapons; their society had neither criminals, prisons nor prisoners. They were so kind-hearted that Columbus noted in his diary that on the day the Santa Maria was shipwrecked, the Arawaks labored for hours to save his crew and cargo. The native people were so honest that not one thing was missing.
    Columbus was so impressed with the hard work of these gentle islanders, that he immediately seized their land for Spain and enslaved them to work in his brutal gold mines. Within only two years, 125,000 (half of the population) of the original natives on the island were dead.
    If I were a Native American, I would mark October 12, 1492, as a black day on my calendar.
    Shockingly, Columbus supervised the selling of native girls into sexual slavery. Young girls of the ages 9 to 10 were the most desired by his men. In 1500, Columbus casually wrote about it in his log. He said: \”A hundred castellanoes are as easily obtained for a woman as for a farm, and it is very general and there are plenty of dealers who go about looking for girls; those from nine to ten are now in demand.\”
    He forced these peaceful natives work in his gold mines until they died of exhaustion. If an \”Indian\” worker did not deliver his full quota of gold dust by Columbus\’ deadline, soldiers would cut off the man\’s hands and tie them around his neck to send a message. Slavery was so intolerable for these sweet, gentle island people that at one point, 100 of them committed mass suicide. Catholic law forbade the enslavement of Christians, but Columbus solved this problem. He simply refused to baptize the native people of Hispaniola.
    On his second trip to the New World, Columbus brought cannons and attack dogs. If a native resisted slavery, he would cut off a nose or an ear. If slaves tried to escape, Columbus had them burned alive. Other times, he sent attack dogs to hunt them down, and the dogs would tear off the arms and legs of the screaming natives while they were still alive. If the Spaniards ran short of meat to feed the dogs, Arawak babies were killed for dog food.
    Columbus\’ acts of cruelty were so unspeakable and so legendary – even in his own day – that Governor Francisco De Bobadilla arrested Columbus and his two brothers, slapped them into chains, and shipped them off to Spain to answer for their crimes against the Arawaks. But the King and Queen of Spain, their treasury filling up with gold, pardoned Columbus and let him go free.
    One of Columbus\’ men, Bartolome De Las Casas, was so mortified by Columbus\’ brutal atrocities against the native peoples, that he quit working for Columbus and became a Catholic priest. He described how the Spaniards under Columbus\’ command cut off the legs of children who ran from them, to test the sharpness of their blades. According to De Las Casas, the men made bets as to who, with one sweep of his sword, could cut a person in half. He says that Columbus\’ men poured people full of boiling soap. In a single day, De Las Casas was an eye witness as the Spanish soldiers dismembered, beheaded, or raped 3000 native people. \”Such inhumanities and barbarisms were committed in my sight as no age can parallel,\” De Las Casas wrote. \”My eyes have seen these acts so foreign to human nature that now I tremble as I write.\”
    De Las Casas spent the rest of his life trying to protect the helpless native people. But after a while, there were no more natives to protect. Experts generally agree that before 1492, the population on the island of Hispaniola probably numbered above 3 million. Within 20 years of Spanish arrival, it was reduced to only 60,000. Within 50 years, not a single original native inhabitant could be found.
    In 1516, Spanish historian Peter Martyr wrote: \”… a ship without compass, chart, or guide, but only following the trail of dead Indians who had been thrown from the ships could find its way from the Bahamas to Hispaniola.\”
    Christopher Columbus derived most of his income from slavery, De Las Casas noted. In fact, Columbus was the first slave trader in the Americas. As the native slaves died off, they were replaced with black slaves. Columbus\’ son became the first African slave trader in 1505.
    Are you surprised you never learned about any of this in school? I am too. Why do we have this extraordinary gap in our American ethos? Columbus himself kept detailed diaries, as did some of his men including De Las Casas and Michele de Cuneo. (If you don\’t believe me, just Google the words Columbus, sex slave, and gold mine.)
    Columbus\’ reign of terror is one of the darkest chapters in our history. The REAL question is: Why do we celebrate a holiday in honor of this man? (Take three deep breaths. If you\’re like me, your stomach is heaving at this point. I\’m sorry. Sometimes the truth hurts. That said, I\’d like to turn in a more positive direction.)
    Call me crazy, but I think holidays ought to honor people who are worthy of our admiration, true heroes who are positive role models for our children. If we\’re looking for heroes we can truly admire, I\’d like to offer a few candidates. Foremost among them are school kids.
    Let me tell you about some school kids who are changing the world. I think they are worthy of a holiday. My friend Nan Peterson is the director of the Blake School, a K-12 school in Minnesota. She recently visited Kenya. Nan says there are 33 million people in Kenya… and 11 million of them are orphans! Can you imagine that? She went to Kibera, the slum outside Nairobi, and a boy walked up to her and handed her a baby. He said: My father died. My mother died… and I\’m not feeling so good myself. Here, take my sister. If I die, they will throw her into the street to die.
    There are so many orphans in Kenya, the baby girls are throwaways!
    Nan visited an orphanage for girls. The girls were starving to death. They had one old cow that only gave one cup of milk a day. So each girl only got ONE TEASPOON of milk a day!
    After this heartbreaking experience, Nan went home to her school in Minnesota and asked the kids… what can we do? The kids got the idea to make homemade paper and sell it to buy a cow. So they made a bunch of paper, and sold the paper, and when they were done they had enough money to buy… FOUR COWS! And enough food to feed all of the cows for ONE FULL YEAR! These are kids… from 6 years old to 18… saving the lives of kids halfway around the world. And I thought: If a 6-year-old could do that… what could I do?
    At Casady School in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, seemingly \”average\” school kids raised $20,000 to dig clean water wells for children in Ethiopia. These kids are heroes. Why don\’t we celebrate \”Kids Who Are Changing the Planet\” Day?
    Let me ask you a question: Would we celebrate Columbus Day if the story of Christopher Columbus were told from the point-of-view of his victims? No way!
    The truth about Columbus is going to be a hard pill for some folks to swallow. Please, don\’t think I\’m picking on Catholics. All the Catholics I know are wonderful people. I don\’t want to take away their holiday or their hero. But if we\’re looking for a Catholic our kids can admire, the Catholic church has many, many amazing people we could name a holiday after. How about Mother Teresa day? Or St. Francis of Assisi day? Or Betty Williams day (another Catholic Nobel Peace Prize winner). These men and women are truly heroes of peace, not just for Catholics, but for all of us.
    Let\’s come clean. Let\’s tell the truth about Christopher Columbus. Let\’s boycott this outrageous holiday because it honors a mass murderer. If we skip the cute song about \”In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue,\” I don\’t think our first graders will miss it much, do you? True, Columbus\’ brutal treatment of peaceful Native Americans was so horrific… maybe we should hide the truth about Columbus until our kids reach at least High School age. Let\’s teach it to them about the same time we tell them about the Nazi death camps.
    While we\’re at it, let\’s rewrite our history books. From now on, instead of glorifying the exploits of mass murderers like Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, Genghis Khan, and Napoleon Bonaparte, let\’s teach our kids about true heroes, men and women of courage and kindness who devoted their lives to the good of others. There\’s a long list, starting with Florence Nightingale, Mahatma Gandhi, Rev. Martin Luther King, and John F. Kennedy.
    These people were not adventurers who \”discovered\” an island in the Caribbean. They were noble souls who discovered what is best in the human spirit.
    Why don\’t we create a holiday to replace Columbus Day?
    Let\’s call it Heroes of Peace Day.

    Sold native Americans into slavery
    I think that Columbus is guilty of genocide. I believe this because in his own journal he wrote about how easy the natives do what they want them to, and how they would make good slaves “They have no weapons and are all naked without any skill in arms and are very cowardly so that a thousand would not challenge three,” says the journal for December 16th “… Thus they are useful to be commanded and to be made to labor and sow and to do everything else of which there is need and build towns and be taught to wear clothes and learn our customs.” I think Columbus along with the people who came with him were guilty of genocide.
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    ads by adMarketplace I believe this because he followed the steps to commit genocide. First the group was already divided into colonists and natives. Then the Natives were dehumanized and treated like animals. “Then Columbus made a plan to capture the natives and send them to Europe to work as slaves. Next most of the Natives were slain either by the hands of their captors, their own hands, or from overwork, or they were captured as slaves. “The fugitives in the mountains were hunted down with hounds; if they escaped capture, they often died of disease or starvation. Thousands killed themselves by taking a poison made from cassava. Many parents killed their infants to spare them a living death under Spanish rule. In only two years, half the 250,000 Indians on the island were dead… it was the beginning of genocide for the native population. By 1548…not 500 Indians remained in Hispaniola” And finally today people deny that Columbus is guilty of Genocide. Saying that he was a great man who discovered the new world and neglect to say that he was also the starter of genocide against the whole Native American people.
    Read more in History
    « The Wives of Henry VIII
    German Immigration »
    Christopher Columbus started out to find a new sea route to India and took with him three ships the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria. After about 5 weeks Land was sighted at 2 a.m. on October 12, 1492, by a sailor named Rodrigo de Triana, Columbus claimed they discovered a new land, he named it San Salvador. The land had already been discovered and was inhabited by many Native people. The native people he encountered were the Lucayan, Taíno or Arawak. They were a peaceful people who weren’t trying to hurt the Colonists. However the colonists didn’t have the same intentions. In Columbus’ journal he wrote about the natives. “It appears to me, that the people are ingenious, and would be good servants and I am of opinion that they would very readily become Christians, as they appear to have no religion.” Later in his journal he wrote, “I could conquer the whole of them with 50 men, and govern them as I pleased.” The Taínos were enslaved by the Spaniards and worked to death in the mines and plantations they established on Hispaniola. Columbus imposed a burdensome tribute on every Taíno, which if he failed to pay; he would suffer mutilation or execution. When Columbus was in “the new world” he did exploring near Cuba and Hispaniola. The Santa Maria ran aground and had to be abandoned. The local natives let Columbus leave some of his men behind. “Columbus left 39 men and founded the settlement of La Navidad in what is now present-day Haiti.” Later before returning to Spain Columbus decided that since the natives were so easy to control he’d take some back as slaves. “Columbus kidnapped some ten to twenty-five Indians and took them back with him. Only seven or eight of the Indians arrived in Spain alive, but they made quite an impression on Seville.” Columbus’ voyage back may also have brought syphilis back from the New World.

  56. jessica

    On October 13, 2010 at 4:09 pm


    Increased Indian warfare

    Though we do not usually think of Native Americans and \\\\\\\”The New World\\\\\\\” as part of medieval times, it must be remembered people have been living in the Americas for 15000 years.

    Native Americans (American Indians, Amerindians, Ameren’s, Indians, Injuns, or Red Indians) are indigenous peoples, who lived in the Americas prior to the European colonization; some of these ethnic groups still exist. The name \\\\\\\”Indians\\\\\\\” was bestowed by Christopher Columbus, who mistakenly believed that the places he found them were among the islands to the southeast of Asia known to Europeans as the Indies. (See further discussion below).

    Canadians now generally use the term First Nations to refer to Native Americans. In Alaska, because of legal use in the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANSCA) and because of the presence of the Inuit, Yupik, and Aleut peoples, the term Alaskan Native predominates. (See further discussion below.)

    Native Americans officially make up the majority of the population in Bolivia, Peru and Guatemala and are significant in most other former Spanish colonies, with the exception of Costa Rica, Cuba, Argentina, Dominican Republic and Uruguay.

    History

    The Native Americans are widely believed to have come to the Americas via the prehistoric Bering Land Bridge. However, this is not the only theory. Some archaeologists believe that the migration consisted of seafaring tribes that moved along the coast, avoiding mountainous inland terrain and highly variable terrestrial ecosystems. Other researchers have postulated an original settlement by skilled navigators from Oceania, though these American Aborigine people are believed to be nearly extinct. Yet another theory claims an early crossing of the Atlantic Ocean by people originating in Europe. Many native peoples do not believe the migration theory at all. The creation stories of many tribes place the people in North America from the beginning of time. Mormon tradition holds that the Native Americans represent one of the lost tribes of Israel.

    Based on anthropological evidence, at least three distinct migrations from Siberia occurred. The first wave of migration came into a land populated by the large mammals of the late Pleistocene epoch, including mammoths, horses, giant sloths, and wooly rhinoceroses. The Clovis culture provides one example of such immigrants. Later the Folsom culture developed, based on the hunting of bison.

    The second immigration wave comprised the Athabascan people, including the ancestors of the Apaches and Navajos; the third wave consisted of the Inuits, the Yupiks, and the Aleuts, who may have come by sea over the Bering Strait. The Athabascan peoples generally lived in Alaska and western Canada but some Athabascans migrated south as far as California and the American Southwest, and became the ancestors of tribes now there.

    The descendants of the third wave are so ethnically distinct from the remainder of the indigenous inhabitants of the Americas that they are not usually included in the terms \\\\\\\”American Indian\\\\\\\” or \\\\\\\”First Nations\\\\\\\”.

    In recent years, anthropological evidence of migration has been supplemented by studies based on molecular genetics. The provisional results from this field suggest that four distinct migrations from Asia occurred; and, most surprisingly, provide evidence of smaller-scale, contemporaneous human migration from Europe. This suggests that the migrant population, living in Europe at the time of the most recent ice age, adopted a life-style resembling that lived by Inuits and Yupiks in recent centuries.

    In the Mississippi valley of the United States, in Mexico and Central America, and in the Andes of South America Native American civilizations arose with farming cultures and city-states.

    The Arrival of Europeans

    The European colonization of the Americas forever changed the lives and cultures of the Native Americans. In the 15th to 19th centuries, their populations were decimated, by the privations of displacement, by disease, and in many cases by warfare with European groups and enslavement by them. The first Native American group encountered by Columbus, the 250,000 Arawaks of Haiti, were violently enslaved. Only 500 survived by the year 1550, and the group was totally extinct before 1650. Over the next 400 years, the experiences of other Native Americans with Europeans would not always amount to genocide, but they would typically be disastrous for the Native Americans.

    In the 15th century Spaniards and other Europeans brought horses to the Americas. Some of these animals escaped their owners and began to breed and increase their numbers in the wild. Ironically, the horse had originally evolved in the Americas, but the last American horses died out at the end of the last ice age. The re-introduction of the horse, however, had a profound impact on Native American cultures in the Great Plains of North America. This new mode of travel made it possible for some tribes to greatly expand their territories, exchange goods with neighboring tribes and to more easily capture game.

    Europeans also brought diseases against which the Native Americans had no immunity. Sometimes they did this intentionally, but often it was unintentional. Ailments such as chicken pox and measles, though common and rarely fatal among Europeans, often proved fatal to Native Americans. More deadly diseases such as smallpox were especially deadly to Native American populations. It is difficult to estimate the percentage of the total Native American population killed by these diseases, since waves of disease oftentimes preceded White scouts and often destroyed entire villages. Some historians have argued that more than 80% of some Indian populations may have died due to European-derived diseases.

    The first reported case of white men scalping Native Americans took place in New Hampshire colony on February 20, 1725, though it is thought that Indians learned scalping from Americans who, at times, collected them for bounties.

    Four Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy sided with the British and the Tories of the American Revolutionary War. The colonists were especially outraged at the Wyoming Massacre and the Cherry Valley Massacre, which occurred in 1788. In 1799 Congress sent Major General John Sullivan on what has become known as the Sullivan Expedition to neutralize the Iroquois threat to the American side. The two allied nations were rewarded, at least temporarily by keeping title to their lands after the Revolution. The title was later purchased very cheaply by Massachusetts and sold off in the Phelps and Gorham Purchase and the Holland Purchase, after which by treaty, it became a part of New York State. The tribes were moved to reservations or sent westward. Part of the Cayuga Nation was granted a reservation in British Canada See also History of New York.

    In the 19th century the United States forced Native Americans onto marginal lands in areas farther and farther west as white settlement of the young nation expanded in that direction. Numerous Indian Wars broke out between US forces and many different tribes. Authorities drafted countless treaties during this period and then later nullified them for various reasons. Well-known battles include the untypical Native American victory at the Battle of Little Bighorn in 1876, and the massacre of Native Americans at Wounded Knee in 1890. On January 31, 1876 the United States government ordered all Native Americans to move into reservations or reserves. This spelled the end of the Prairie Culture that developed around the use of the horse for hunting, travel and trading.

    American policy toward Native Americans has been an evolving process. In the late nineteenth century reformers in efforts to civilize Indians adapted the practice of educating native children in boarding schools. The experience in the boarding schools which existed from 1875 to 1928 was difficult for Indian children who were forbidden to speak their native languages and in numerous other ways forced to adopt white cultural practices.

    Military defeat, cultural pressure, confinement on reservations, forced cultural assimilation, the outlawing of native languages and culture, forced sterilizations, termination policies of the 50\\\\\\\’s and 60\\\\\\\’s, and (especially) slavery have had deleterious effects on Native Americans\\\\\\\’ mental and ultimately physical health. Contemporary problems include poverty, alcoholism, heart disease, and diabetes.

    What name best identifies this group of people?

    The term \\\\\\\”Native American\\\\\\\” originated with anthropologists who preferred it to the former appellations of \\\\\\\”Indian\\\\\\\” or \\\\\\\”American Indian\\\\\\\”, which they considered inaccurate, as these terms bear no relationship to the actual origins of Aboriginal Americans (or American Aborigines), and were born of the misapprehension on the part of Christopher Columbus, arriving at islands off the east coast of the North American continent, that he had reached the East Indies. The words \\\\\\\”Indian\\\\\\\” and \\\\\\\”American Indian\\\\\\\” continue in widespread use in North America, even amongst Native Americans themselves, many of whom do not feel offended by the terms.[1] But the appropriateness of this usage has become controversial since the late 20th century; many feel the \\\\\\\”Indian\\\\\\\” term undesirable as symbolic of the domination of these peoples by the European colonists. Others, in turn, resent criticism of their traditional way of speaking. \\\\\\\”Red Indian\\\\\\\” is a common British term, useful in differentiating this group from a distinct group of people referred to as East Indians.

    One minority view has advocated the name \\\\\\\”Asiatic Americans\\\\\\\” as a more accurate term because of the popular theory that such peoples migrated to the Americas from Asia across an ice bridge covering the Bering Straits some 20,000 years ago. Competent fossil evidence supports the case for such a migration. However, this term is considered offensive by many American Indians because most native religions state that American Indians have been in the Western Hemisphere since the dawn of time. Furthermore, the strong tradition among archaeologists and anthropologists, is to indicate the geographic origins of a people as relating to the region where researchers first encountered them or their remains.

    One difficulty with the term \\\\\\\”Native American\\\\\\\” as a substitute for \\\\\\\”American Indian\\\\\\\” lies in the fact that there exist several groups of people indisputably indigenous to the Americas, but who fall outside the classification of \\\\\\\”American Indians\\\\\\\”, for example the Innu people of the Labrador/Quebec peninsula and the Inuit, Yupik, and Aleut peoples of the far north of the continent. Another argument is that any person born in America is native to it.

    Another difficulty is that many Native American groups migrated (or were displaced) to their current locations after the start of European colonization, and therefore it can be argued that they have no more \\\\\\\”native\\\\\\\” ties to their current locations than do the Europeans. However, as they were moving within America, they remained native to the America.

    The term \\\\\\\”Native American\\\\\\\” is woefully inadequate from a scientific viewpoint, as Homo sapiens is an invasive species in the Americas. From a legal standpoint, however, any person born in the Americas is a native American (though not Native American).

    Killed Native Americans because of Greed
    Yes he did. He killed a huge percentage of Arawak people in what is know known as the Bahamas. He started a genocide and was a murderer.
    he and his men also killed off the entire taino tribe. Columbus brought back Natives after his first voyage to show what he had found, there is no approximate number of how many people he killed, maybe not by himself… but because of him they died. I would say over 10 thousand, at least. Christopher Columbus was a terrible man. He only came to our country for gold, he killed so many native Americans who were innocent and he also brought many new diseases to the \\\\\\\”new world\\\\\\\”. Many people are surprised to learn that Christopher Columbus and his men enslaved native inhabitants of the West Indies, forced them to convert to Christianity, and subdued them with violence in an effort to seek riches. For readers who are skeptical or wish to learn more, this page contains information that can be confirmed by consulting the sources cited. After reading this page, please also see Examining the Reputation of Columbus.
    In Pursuit of Profits
    On April 17, 1492, before his first voyage to the Americas, Columbus negotiated a business contract with King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain, entitling him to 10% of all profits. In this contract, the Spanish sovereigns agreed:
    \\\\\\\”that of all and every kind of merchandise, whether pearls, precious stones, gold, silver, spices, and other objects and merchandise whatsoever, of whatever kind, name and sort, which may be bought, bartered, discovered, acquired and obtained within the limits of the said Admiralty, Your Highnesses grant from now henceforth to the said Don Crist�bal [Christopher Columbus] … the tenth part of the whole, after deducting all the expenses which may be incurred therein.\\\\\\\” [1]
    After his fourth and final voyage to the Americas, Columbus summed up his feelings about gold in a July 7, 1503, letter to Ferdinand and Isabella: \\\\\\\”Gold is most excellent; gold is treasure, and he who possesses it does all he wishes to in this world.\\\\\\\” [2]
    After Turning Out the Jews
    Beyond profits, Columbus sought to convert native people to Catholicism. In the prologue to his journal of the first voyage, Columbus wrote to Ferdinand and Isabella:
    \\\\\\\”YOUR HIGHNESSES, as Catholic Christians and Princes who love the holy Christian faith, and the propagation of it, and who are enemies to the sect of Mahoma [Islam] and to all idolatries and heresies, resolved to send me, Crist�bal Colon, to the said parts of India to see the said princes … with a view that they might be converted to our holy faith …. Thus, after having turned out all the Jews from all your kingdoms and lordships … your Highnesses gave orders to me that with a sufficient fleet I should go to the said parts of India …. I shall forget sleep, and shall work at the business of navigation, so that the service is performed.\\\\\\\” [3]
    The Enslavement of Native People
    On October 12, 1492 (the first day he encountered the native people of the Americas), Columbus wrote in his journal: \\\\\\\”They should be good servants …. I, our Lord being pleased, will take hence, at the time of my departure, six natives for your Highnesses.\\\\\\\” These captives were later paraded through the streets of Barcelona and Seville when Columbus returned to Spain. [4]

    From his very first contact with native people, Columbus had their domination in mind. For example, on October 14, 1492, Columbus wrote in his journal, \\\\\\\”with fifty men they can all be subjugated and made to do what is required of them.\\\\\\\” [5] These were not mere words: after his second voyage, Columbus sent back a consignment of natives to be sold as slaves. [6]

    Yet in an April, 1493, letter to Luis de Santangel (a patron who helped fund the first voyage), Columbus made clear that the people he encountered had doe nnothing to deserve ill treatment. According to Columbus:
    \\\\\\\”they are artless and generous with what they have, to such a degree as no one would believe but him who had seen it. Of anything they have, if it be asked for, they never say no, but do rather invite the person to accept it, and show as much lovingness as though they would give their hearts.\\\\\\\” [7]
    Nonetheless, later in the letter Columbus went on to say:
    \\\\\\\”their Highnesses may see that I shall give them as much gold as they need …. and slaves as many as they shall order to be shipped.\\\\\\\” [8]
    Pope Gives the Americas to Spain
    Following Columbus\\\\\\\’ discovery, Pope Alexander VI issued a May 4, 1493, papal bull granting official ownership of the New World to Ferdinand and Isabella. To these monarchs, the Pope declared:
    \\\\\\\”We of our own motion, and not at your solicitation, do give, concede, and assign for ever to you and your successors, all the islands, and main lands, discovered; and which may hereafter, be discovered, towards the west and south; whether they be situated towards India, or towards any other part whatsoever, and give you absolute power in them.\\\\\\\” [9]
    This decree did not go unchallenged. Francis I of France, for example, later quipped: \\\\\\\”The sun shines on me as well as on others. I should be very happy to see the clause in Adam\\\\\\\’s will which excluded me from my share when the world was being divided.\\\\\\\” [10]

    Nonetheless, the Pope\\\\\\\’s declaration ultimately had dire consequences for native inhabitants of the Americas. Beginning in 1514 Spanish conquerors adopted \\\\\\\”the Requirement,\\\\\\\” an ultimatum in which Indians were forced to accept \\\\\\\”the Church as the Ruler and Superior of the whole world\\\\\\\” or face persecution. If Indians did not immediately comply, the Requirement warned them:
    \\\\\\\”We shall take you and your wives and your children, and shall make slaves of them, and as such shall sell and dispose of them as their Highnesses may command; and we shall take away your goods, and shall do all the harm and damage that we can.\\\\\\\” [11]
    Often the Requirement was read to Indians without translation, or in some cases even from ships before crew members landed to kill Indians and take slaves. [12]

    In between notes:Once again, it\\\\\\\’s time to celebrate Columbus Day. Yet, the stunning truth is: If Christopher Columbus were alive today, he would be put on trial for crimes against humanity. Columbus\\\\\\\’ reign of terror, as documented by noted historians, was so bloody, his legacy so unspeakably cruel, that Columbus makes a modern villain like Saddam Hussein look like a pale codfish.
    Question: Why do we honor a man who, if he were alive today, would almost certainly be sitting on Death Row awaiting execution?
    If you\\\\\\\’d like to know the true story about Christopher Columbus, please read on. But I warn you, it\\\\\\\’s not for the faint of heart.
    Here\\\\\\\’s the basics. On the second Monday in October each year, we celebrate Columbus Day (this year, it\\\\\\\’s on October 11th). We teach our school kids a cute little song that goes: \\\\\\\”In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue.\\\\\\\” It\\\\\\\’s an American tradition, as American as pizza pie. Or is it? Surprisingly, the true story of Christopher Columbus has very little in common with the myth we all learned in school.
    Columbus Day, as we know it in the United States, was invented by the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic fraternal service organization. Back in the 1930s, they were looking for a Catholic hero as a role-model their kids could look up to. In 1934, as a result of lobbying by the Knights of Columbus, Congress and President Franklin Roosevelt signed Columbus Day into law as a federal holiday to honor this courageous explorer. Or so we thought.
    There are several problems with this. First of all, Columbus wasn\\\\\\\’t the first European to discover America. As we all know, the Viking, Leif Ericson probably founded a Norse village on Newfoundland some 500 years earlier. So, hat\\\\\\\’s off to Leif. But if you think about it, the whole concept of discovering America is, well, arrogant. After all, the Native Americans discovered North America about 14,000 years before Columbus was even born! Surprisingly, DNA evidence now suggests that courageous Polynesian adventurers sailed dugout canoes across the Pacific and settled in South America long before the Vikings.
    Second, Columbus wasn\\\\\\\’t a hero. When he set foot on that sandy beach in the Bahamas on October 12, 1492, Columbus discovered that the islands were inhabited by friendly, peaceful people called the Lucayans, Taínos and Arawaks. Writing in his diary, Columbus said they were a handsome, smart and kind people. He noted that the gentle Arawaks were remarkable for their hospitality. \\\\\\\”They offered to share with anyone and when you ask for something, they never say no,\\\\\\\” he said. The Arawaks had no weapons; their society had neither criminals, prisons nor prisoners. They were so kind-hearted that Columbus noted in his diary that on the day the Santa Maria was shipwrecked, the Arawaks labored for hours to save his crew and cargo. The native people were so honest that not one thing was missing.
    Columbus was so impressed with the hard work of these gentle islanders, that he immediately seized their land for Spain and enslaved them to work in his brutal gold mines. Within only two years, 125,000 (half of the population) of the original natives on the island were dead.
    If I were a Native American, I would mark October 12, 1492, as a black day on my calendar.
    Shockingly, Columbus supervised the selling of native girls into sexual slavery. Young girls of the ages 9 to 10 were the most desired by his men. In 1500, Columbus casually wrote about it in his log. He said: \\\\\\\”A hundred castellanoes are as easily obtained for a woman as for a farm, and it is very general and there are plenty of dealers who go about looking for girls; those from nine to ten are now in demand.\\\\\\\”
    He forced these peaceful natives work in his gold mines until they died of exhaustion. If an \\\\\\\”Indian\\\\\\\” worker did not deliver his full quota of gold dust by Columbus\\\\\\\’ deadline, soldiers would cut off the man\\\\\\\’s hands and tie them around his neck to send a message. Slavery was so intolerable for these sweet, gentle island people that at one point, 100 of them committed mass suicide. Catholic law forbade the enslavement of Christians, but Columbus solved this problem. He simply refused to baptize the native people of Hispaniola.
    On his second trip to the New World, Columbus brought cannons and attack dogs. If a native resisted slavery, he would cut off a nose or an ear. If slaves tried to escape, Columbus had them burned alive. Other times, he sent attack dogs to hunt them down, and the dogs would tear off the arms and legs of the screaming natives while they were still alive. If the Spaniards ran short of meat to feed the dogs, Arawak babies were killed for dog food.
    Columbus\\\\\\\’ acts of cruelty were so unspeakable and so legendary – even in his own day – that Governor Francisco De Bobadilla arrested Columbus and his two brothers, slapped them into chains, and shipped them off to Spain to answer for their crimes against the Arawaks. But the King and Queen of Spain, their treasury filling up with gold, pardoned Columbus and let him go free.
    One of Columbus\\\\\\\’ men, Bartolome De Las Casas, was so mortified by Columbus\\\\\\\’ brutal atrocities against the native peoples, that he quit working for Columbus and became a Catholic priest. He described how the Spaniards under Columbus\\\\\\\’ command cut off the legs of children who ran from them, to test the sharpness of their blades. According to De Las Casas, the men made bets as to who, with one sweep of his sword, could cut a person in half. He says that Columbus\\\\\\\’ men poured people full of boiling soap. In a single day, De Las Casas was an eye witness as the Spanish soldiers dismembered, beheaded, or raped 3000 native people. \\\\\\\”Such inhumanities and barbarisms were committed in my sight as no age can parallel,\\\\\\\” De Las Casas wrote. \\\\\\\”My eyes have seen these acts so foreign to human nature that now I tremble as I write.\\\\\\\”
    De Las Casas spent the rest of his life trying to protect the helpless native people. But after a while, there were no more natives to protect. Experts generally agree that before 1492, the population on the island of Hispaniola probably numbered above 3 million. Within 20 years of Spanish arrival, it was reduced to only 60,000. Within 50 years, not a single original native inhabitant could be found.
    In 1516, Spanish historian Peter Martyr wrote: \\\\\\\”… a ship without compass, chart, or guide, but only following the trail of dead Indians who had been thrown from the ships could find its way from the Bahamas to Hispaniola.\\\\\\\”
    Christopher Columbus derived most of his income from slavery, De Las Casas noted. In fact, Columbus was the first slave trader in the Americas. As the native slaves died off, they were replaced with black slaves. Columbus\\\\\\\’ son became the first African slave trader in 1505.
    Are you surprised you never learned about any of this in school? I am too. Why do we have this extraordinary gap in our American ethos? Columbus himself kept detailed diaries, as did some of his men including De Las Casas and Michele de Cuneo. (If you don\\\\\\\’t believe me, just Google the words Columbus, sex slave, and gold mine.)
    Columbus\\\\\\\’ reign of terror is one of the darkest chapters in our history. The REAL question is: Why do we celebrate a holiday in honor of this man? (Take three deep breaths. If you\\\\\\\’re like me, your stomach is heaving at this point. I\\\\\\\’m sorry. Sometimes the truth hurts. That said, I\\\\\\\’d like to turn in a more positive direction.)
    Call me crazy, but I think holidays ought to honor people who are worthy of our admiration, true heroes who are positive role models for our children. If we\\\\\\\’re looking for heroes we can truly admire, I\\\\\\\’d like to offer a few candidates. Foremost among them are school kids.
    Let me tell you about some school kids who are changing the world. I think they are worthy of a holiday. My friend Nan Peterson is the director of the Blake School, a K-12 school in Minnesota. She recently visited Kenya. Nan says there are 33 million people in Kenya… and 11 million of them are orphans! Can you imagine that? She went to Kibera, the slum outside Nairobi, and a boy walked up to her and handed her a baby. He said: My father died. My mother died… and I\\\\\\\’m not feeling so good myself. Here, take my sister. If I die, they will throw her into the street to die.
    There are so many orphans in Kenya, the baby girls are throwaways!
    Nan visited an orphanage for girls. The girls were starving to death. They had one old cow that only gave one cup of milk a day. So each girl only got ONE TEASPOON of milk a day!
    After this heartbreaking experience, Nan went home to her school in Minnesota and asked the kids… what can we do? The kids got the idea to make homemade paper and sell it to buy a cow. So they made a bunch of paper, and sold the paper, and when they were done they had enough money to buy… FOUR COWS! And enough food to feed all of the cows for ONE FULL YEAR! These are kids… from 6 years old to 18… saving the lives of kids halfway around the world. And I thought: If a 6-year-old could do that… what could I do?
    At Casady School in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, seemingly \\\\\\\”average\\\\\\\” school kids raised $20,000 to dig clean water wells for children in Ethiopia. These kids are heroes. Why don\\\\\\\’t we celebrate \\\\\\\”Kids Who Are Changing the Planet\\\\\\\” Day?
    Let me ask you a question: Would we celebrate Columbus Day if the story of Christopher Columbus were told from the point-of-view of his victims? No way!
    The truth about Columbus is going to be a hard pill for some folks to swallow. Please, don\\\\\\\’t think I\\\\\\\’m picking on Catholics. All the Catholics I know are wonderful people. I don\\\\\\\’t want to take away their holiday or their hero. But if we\\\\\\\’re looking for a Catholic our kids can admire, the Catholic church has many, many amazing people we could name a holiday after. How about Mother Teresa day? Or St. Francis of Assisi day? Or Betty Williams day (another Catholic Nobel Peace Prize winner). These men and women are truly heroes of peace, not just for Catholics, but for all of us.
    Let\\\\\\\’s come clean. Let\\\\\\\’s tell the truth about Christopher Columbus. Let\\\\\\\’s boycott this outrageous holiday because it honors a mass murderer. If we skip the cute song about \\\\\\\”In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue,\\\\\\\” I don\\\\\\\’t think our first graders will miss it much, do you? True, Columbus\\\\\\\’ brutal treatment of peaceful Native Americans was so horrific… maybe we should hide the truth about Columbus until our kids reach at least High School age. Let\\\\\\\’s teach it to them about the same time we tell them about the Nazi death camps.
    While we\\\\\\\’re at it, let\\\\\\\’s rewrite our history books. From now on, instead of glorifying the exploits of mass murderers like Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, Genghis Khan, and Napoleon Bonaparte, let\\\\\\\’s teach our kids about true heroes, men and women of courage and kindness who devoted their lives to the good of others. There\\\\\\\’s a long list, starting with Florence Nightingale, Mahatma Gandhi, Rev. Martin Luther King, and John F. Kennedy.
    These people were not adventurers who \\\\\\\”discovered\\\\\\\” an island in the Caribbean. They were noble souls who discovered what is best in the human spirit.
    Why don\\\\\\\’t we create a holiday to replace Columbus Day?
    Let\\\\\\\’s call it Heroes of Peace Day.

  57. lalalagirl

    On October 13, 2010 at 8:35 pm


    Omg people!!!! It’s just Christopher Columbus…..Grow up cuz that was back then besides he is dead……GROW UP!!!!

  58. Ooh La La

    On October 18, 2010 at 9:46 pm


    Columbus was a great man and should not be guilty of Genocide!

  59. Aishah Bowron

    On November 18, 2010 at 4:03 pm


    I love your essay. Yes I agree that he is aa evil genocidal murderer. He is more deadlier than the chemicals used for lethal injection executions. He enslaved, killed and butchered millions of poor innocent native Americans. He should have hanged for his crimes !.

  60. Vicks

    On January 21, 2011 at 1:26 pm


    Why we never learned the real truth about Columbus in our school history books growing up is beyond me. We should not have Columbus day to celebrate a cruel man period… All I can say I hope this generation will spread the word about what really happen in 1492 let\’s get it straight. Slavery is unacceptable for any means. Im a History major and believe me its not pretty. There is a major coverup regarding Columbus.

  61. Woody McBreairty

    On October 10, 2011 at 2:10 pm


    There shuld be no day honoring Columbus in America. His role in American history is very distorted & misrepresented.

  62. sharone

    On November 8, 2011 at 2:23 pm


    i wonder if you spanish haters have ever been to spain, i spent a lot of time living there and i found them to be wonderful people. if you judge people by history then we should all hang our head in shame…

  63. j_.lo

    On May 24, 2012 at 2:27 am


    I have Spanish in my blood, my major was California Real Estate and Nursing, studied nursing in private college. Being born here in United States and having full knowledge of what you guys are talking about. This things began to in th early 1500’s. Today is 2012, if you are not an Alzheimer patient that lives in the past, then try to remember that life goes on, we adapt to new environments just as wild animals do, kill is part of our animalistic nature, not to say that I will kill my neighbor, but what I am saying is, forgive, move on, educate yourselves, help one another, they say that we live in this world only to prepare for our next life, for knowledge. We know better. Love ya.

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