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Rescuing a Bomber “Unique” World War Ii in The Channel

The plane, located by divers in 2008, was shot down on August 26, 1940 during the Battle of Britain off the coast of Kent, southeast English.

Image of World War II bomber in formation with other

A German bomber Dornier DO 17Z of the Second World War has been rescued from the bottom of the Channel in good condition, after being plunged more than 70 years, said the Museum of the Royal Air Force (RAF).

The unit, the only one of this kind that is preserved in the UK, was recovered last night after falling winds make possible the work of rescue.

The plane, located by divers in 2008, has been identified as a Dornier DO 17Z Werke number 1160, which was shot down on August 26, 1940 during the Battle of Britain off the coast of Kent, southeast English.

“Unique and unprecedented Survivor»

Two of the four crew members died when the plane crashed in waters off the coast of Kent while the other two were captured by British forces.

A specialized team of RAF took weeks trying to get the plane of the channel bed, but bad weather forced the cancellation of operations several times. The aircraft was built with the help of a crane mounted on an offshore platform and wires placed around the fuselage.

The Dornier DO will be taken today to the port of Ramsgate, Kent, before being transported to the conservation center in the town of RAF Cosford, Shropshire County (northwest England) to be restored, and it is expected to be displayed to the public in about two years.

Since it was located in 2008, the museum’s experts have worked to find a way out of the sea and among the options considered was to build a cage around the unit, but this idea was later abandoned.

This plane has been nicknamed “the flying pencil” for its narrow fuselage. “The discovery and recovery of the Dornier is of national and international importance.’s A project that takes account reconciliation and remembrance”, as noted by the director of the RAF Museum, Peter Dye.

“The device is a unique and unprecedented survivor from the Battle of Britain and the Blitz” said Dye. The salvage project was made possible through a grant of 345,000 pounds (413,000 euros) granted by the National Heritage Foundation (NLSF, acronym in English).

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