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Technology: Providing New Opportunities for Criminality?

In 2007 we have reached a point in history in which citizens of every nation are seemingly interdependent on a global scale. at entry level, the competition grows more and more fierce and only nations with adequate disposable income can keep pace in this fast changing world and global economy. strategic alignment of political hopefuls, criminal elements and law enforcement officers is a common practice around the world. read how a surge in new technology has given rise to new opportunities for criminality.

In 2007, we have reached a point in history in which citizens of every nation are seemingly interdependent on a global scale. Each country bringing their goods to a variety of newly open markets which cater to no single one, but instead, welcome all to exchange beneath the auspices. This new world increasingly relies on new forms of labor and different skills more so than any of us ever imagined, and, even fewer of us have prepared. The competition grows increasingly fierce at entry level, where only nations with adequate disposable income can keep pace in this fast changing world and new global economy. In essence, keeping pace in the new global market is much more a matter of survival of the fittest than when our ancestors carved out a new home on the vast frontier, naming it America. Yet, while many things have changed, or will change, many others remain the same.

Strategic alignment of political hopefuls, criminal elements, and law enforcement officers is a common practice around the world. As citizens of a global economy, we are haunted by a proliferation of crime made possible by technology. This and other institutional profiteering tend to lend to a rise in oppositional and electoral exploits in an effort to gain favor in order to carry forward in a similar manner is now common practice.

This lack of sincerity in publicly held positions, in addition to new alignment of countries and nations, does little to promote a sense of well being for citizens around the globe. In sharp contrast, it seems the only faction or groups honest concerning their actions are the organized crime syndicates. Of course, government and politics must pave the way for citizens and nations to interact one with another, and in recent history, we recognize NAFTA and Perestroika as two such economic agendas. We will discuss Perestroika later. NAFTA is the North American Free Trade Agreement between the United States, Canada, and Mexico. These are two such agendas, which openly and publicly announced their existence along bringing forth new policies and emerging markets. Thus, geopolitical events can create opportunity for the proliferation of transnational crime.

Political defenders of both trade agreements suggest the rise of the modern criminal elements is directly related to the upstart of new and easily accessible market outlets such as those created by new information technologies and the Internet. The surge in identity theft and credit card fraud tend to support this theory of new technology giving rise to new opportunity for criminal acts,

However, it is much more realistic to believe in a theory which holds each of the three elements responsible. Crime and politics being fueled by technological advances coupled with human ingenuity and the desire to receive a great deal for very little effort is most plausible.

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