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David Wallace

This is an a significant statement response to David Wallace "Authority and American Usage". Found in Ways of Reading an Anthology for writers. This is very similar to what I did with Lauren Kipnis’ article "Love Labors" Found here: http://relijournal.com/religion/lauren-kipnis-article-review/.

“Issues of tradition vs. egalitarianism in US English are at root political issues and can be effectively addressed only in this article hereby terms a ‘Democratic Spirit’” (625).

            The significant statement I chose to use is what David Wallace described as the “thesis statement for whole article”. In this passage accented by the statement I chose Wallace is saying that the only place where the issues of English in the US are being addressed is in this article. The issues of political correctness, and the over use of political correctness are at the heart of political issues. Politicians are hand tied trying to use the political language to be egalitarian towards both sides of the aisle while trying to move forward. When speaking about the “Democratic Spirit” Wallace is saying that the rigor and humility of the “good old days” when politicians said what they meant and didn’t worry about backlash are gone. US English prevents politicians from saying what they mean with double meanings, double entendres and words that no longer create the Democratic Spirit.

            In choosing this statement I was also looking at the way it was written. The whole article is written like a new Russian immigrant to this country would write. I say Russian because while reading this article that was the voice of the writer in my head, the classic stereotypical Russian with a bad English accent from classic spy movies from the 70s and 80s. The omissions of “the” “of” show this connection. Whether or not I am reading too deep or noticing something that might not even be there I am not sure. However if this is the case this is a further satire on US English as he is writing and in affect speaking as a stereotypical Russian from a classic spy movie. 

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