You are here: Home » Issues » Relativism and Morality

Relativism and Morality

Moral choices are conducted on a daily basis, by every culture, which can be viewed on an ethical scale of right or wrong, by other cultures. In her writing of “Some Moral Minima”, Lenn E. Goodman views several aspects of morality and relativism, and argues that certain things are just wrong. In this article, I will state my opinion on challenges Goodman presents to relativism. I will also provide my thoughts on if there are such universal moral requirements.

Moral choices are conducted on a daily basis, by every culture, which can be viewed on an ethical scale of right or wrong, by other cultures. In her writing of “Some Moral Minima”, Lenn E. Goodman views several aspects of morality and relativism, and argues that certain things are just wrong. In presenting my own morals, I agree with this statement; however, pondering the image, that only one accurate ethic exists and that we may be able to find universal moral requirements and arrive at a multiethnic agreement on issues presented by Goodman is a parable. In this paper, I will state my opinion on challenges Goodman presents to relativism. I will also provide my thoughts on if there are such universal moral requirements.

In Goodman’s initial area of discussion of “Some Moral Minima; Genocide, Famine, and Germ Warfare (Goodman, L.E., 2010)”, she states “Genocide targets individuals as members of a group, seeking to destroy a race, a culture, a linguistic or ethnic identity (Goodman, L.E., 2010)”. I reflect back to after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks were made on The United States. The threat of germ warfare became a very real aspect of war for our nation. Governmental groups, that we were at war against, were considering the decision to use this type of weapon in order to defeat their enemies in larger numbers. With their belief that this was the right way to win the war against us is a case in point of relativism. Majority of Americans viewed this method of war as wrong. Goodman also states, “Wholesale murder is wrong, then, not just for its scale but also for willfully negating individuality, typing its victims, and stirring hatred against the putative failings of the type (Goodman, L.E., 2010)”. With this statement, I am in agreement with Goodman. After the 9-11 attacks, many labeled American Muslims as terrorists simply because they were Muslims like the terrorist who bestowed the attacks. This was no different from those terrorist believing that each American that was killed that day held the same beliefs the Al-Qaeda were fighting against.   

When discussing the topics genocide, famine, and germ warfare, Goodman delivers a great argument on why genocide would be better off if it were considered universally immoral. She declares, “Escalating violence strips away moral barriers and blocks the view of faces (Goodman, L.E., 2010)”. However, Goodman also provides the argument that “warfare is not always wrong (Goodman, L.E., 2010)”, Yet, she does continue on to write “war is suspect: Its dynamic to readily escapes control through the illusion that weapons are only tools and war itself just another device, the natural extension of diplomacy (Goodman, L.E., 2010).” I do feel uncomfortable with war being related to anything natural and can relate to her opinion; however, this opinion is not relative to every culture.

1
Liked it
Powered by Powered by Triond
-->