You are here: Home » Issues » Why Do Not We Remember Our Early Years of Life?

Why Do Not We Remember Our Early Years of Life?

The high level of production of neurons is the cause of that man does not have good memories of his early childhood.

The study suggests a direct link between the reduction in the growth of neurons and increasing the memories

Researchers at Children’s Hospital and the University of Toronto, Canada, have found that the high level of production of neurons is the cause of that man can not remember the first years of his life, according to results of a study presented at the conference Annual Canadian Association for Neuroscience. This means that, although the formation of new brain cells is key to enhancing cognition and learning, in the first memory affects mind cleaning old memories.

Neurogenesis or formation of new neurons in the hippocampus, the brain region known to be important for learning and memory, reaches its peak before and after birth. And later, during childhood and adulthood, its production begins to decline.

To check whether there was a relationship between this mechanism and the absence of memories of the early years of life, the authors used young and old mice. In adult animals, the team found that neurogenesis increased after the formation of memory was enough to forget. Also, small mice scientists found that the reduction of neurogenesis after memory formation caused the miss, which normally occurs at this age, it was given.

The study suggests a direct link between the reduction in the growth of neurons and increasing the memories. At the same time found that the opposite can also happen, ie the ability to recall decreased when neurogenesis increases, as occurs during childhood.

Experts said the work offers an explanation for the absence of memories of our early childhood, known as infantile amnesia. One of the study’s authors, Paul Frank-land, an expert in neuroscience and mental health, said that for many years the reason that infantile amnesia there has been a mystery. “We believe our new study begins to explain why we have no memory of those early years. Before the four or five years we have a very dynamic hippocampus can not store information stably “he acknowledged.

Meanwhile Dr. Bettina Forster, Research Unit for Cognitive Neuroscience at City University in London (United Kingdom), explained to the BBC that it is a “very interesting study and elegantly executed showing the direct between neurogenesis and memory formation. ” However, the expert adds that these results question the assumed link between development and childhood amnesia verbal and challenged some psychological and psycho therapeutic theories on the subject.

0
Liked it
Powered by Powered by Triond
-->