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Movie Review: Trouble with The Curve

The character of Mickey (Amy Adams) is walked through these trivial romantic relationships with a forgettable Greg (Peter Hermann) and ridiculously accelerated relationship with Johnny (Justin Timberlake).

Trouble with the Curve [7.5/10]: The real problem with Hollywood and there constant desire to have to have a romance thrown somewhere in the film, even if it does not require one. This should have been a simple film about a relationship between a father and a daughter, but they pushed the romance between the daughter and an ex-ball player to far. I am not saying it cannot exist, but I am stating that it doesn’t need to take away from the real story of a father and daughter reconciling after years of hardly even talking to one another. Watching the film the problem is not the acting Amy Adams, Justin Timberlake and Clint Eastwood play off each other well. Even the directing is good it captures the subculture of the scouting culture the way you would imagine it to be. These solid points stop the film from being mediocre.

            The problem lies in the screenplay, the essential blueprint for the film. The character of Mickey (Amy Adams) is walked through these trivial romantic relationships with a forgettable Greg (Peter Hermann) and ridiculously accelerated relationship with Johnny (Justin Timberlake) and as I mentioned earlier the acting wasn’t the issue, but the management of the secondary plot weighing down the film. The screen time provided to the B plot is almost parasitic in nature. Screenwriter Randy Brown adds scenes into this story that seem like notes from company execs rather than allowing main plot to breathe. The writer could have simply left Mickey’s character single and took it’s time have her relationship with Johnny going from flirtatious friends to ending the film with the hint of a buddy relationship.

            The relevance of why I am even addressing the issue is because at some points in the film main story, which is endearing, seemed to be almost hijacked at times by the love story subplot. The story of Gus (Clint Eastwood) and Mickey is more interesting and has much more depth.  This is what should motivate you to watch the film. They even use old stock from former Eastwood films to hit what should be a strong scene home (pun intended), but it is almost lost, because the weight of the subplot. The Screenwriter Randy Brown may have a much better draft lying around his residence, but unfortunately it wasn’t the one that was made. 

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