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Examples of Constructive and Destructive Feedback

This article discusses constructive feedback tools. Positive and negative feedback in a classroom setting is the main point of emphasis in this discussion. Examples of positive and negative results can be helpful. Two examples, one from a public school teacher’s perspective, the other from a safety in the workplace standpoint give telling information regarding the importance of a successful feedback plan and style of communication.

 Examples of positive and negative results can be helpful. Two examples, one from a public school teacher’s perspective, the other from a safety in the workplace standpoint give telling information regarding the importance of a successful feedback plan and style of communication.

            Effective feedback in the classroom is an underutilized component to assess student achievement. When the teacher is untrained in the use of self and peer feedback, techniques miss valuable learning and data collection strategies. Sonya C. Carr (2008) discusses the positive impact of teaching schoolchildren to provide effective feedback to his or her and classmates.  “Feedback needs to be corrective, timely and criterion-referenced for successful using in the classroom…and is most valuable to students when they have the opportunity to use it to revise their thinking as they are working” (p.25). In the particular classroom cited as using peer feedback, the students are introduced to Peer evaluations by using a comprehensive systematic process. Ground rules are established and expectations are set.  Students receive a Peer- Evaluation Checklist designed to give feedback that is concrete, non-judgmental and that the receiver can understand and use. Equipping students to give and receive constructive feedback can prove to be a valuable tool for effective communication.

Cover of Effective Communication

      In the workplace, co-workers often fail to communicate efficiently many times leading to a breakdown in work relationships and organizational procedures. Safety related communication is one area found to inhibit a safe work environment. One reason might be that workers do not feel empowered to give co-workers feedback about poor safety practices.  Many workers feel warnings, if given, will go unheeded or the recipient will not receive the feedback positively. Fear of further relationship complications on the job may result (Williams & Geller, 2008). Understanding communication styles, being aware of the importance of listening and having the ability to receive feedback are essential components to employee communicative skills. Making non-personal comments, asking questions to get the dialogue going, and presenting an authentic attitude of caring, helps keep lines of effective feedback open. Increasing the positive discussion around giving and accepting feedback by giving ample praise to those who are practicing safety precautions creates and maintains an atmosphere of cohesiveness and will encourage others to follow safe practices.

Providing effective feedback is not a difficult process. Some simple techniques, tools and methods are available to anyone that might feel they need help or want to increase their effectiveness. The model of communications brings elements that seem natural and almost overly simple in their usage.

Using skills like decision-making and problem solving to increase effective communications is a good way to start building a foundation for providing effective feedback.  Communications skills like effective listening and acknowledgement also provide building blocks for effective feedback. Using tools like the improvement plan will increase the overall effectiveness of an organization in training communication skills.

Ineffective or incorrect feedback can result from lack of discipline or lapses in focus on communications. The most common mistake in communications is from not listening and talking constantly. In this situation the person has no means to communicate feedback and becomes frustrated.  No two-way communication exists and is therefore ineffective.  Effective communication requires an interchange of communication.

Finally, the examples of destructive and constructive feedback show the dynamics of communications at work. In the peer evaluation example, the students give and receive feedback based on written evaluation forms solidifying a practice for future use. In the negative example, the failure of peers to give safety advice exemplifies our breakdown in communication as a society.  As a society, a trend exists of non-confrontational behavior in which people fail to act because of fear of rejection. People want to look the other way because it is difficult, sometimes painful to be assertive and confront someone when they are doing something wrong.

Be sure to read: Repression and the Ruling Class

Special Education and Main-streaming

Can Students Receive Transition Services Under Section 504 Law?

What Drives Effective Communication?

Effective Non-verbal Communication

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User Comments
  1. Michal Dorcak

    On November 30, 2010 at 11:45 pm


    Interesting article.

  2. dino renaldo

    On December 1, 2010 at 12:18 am


    good share thanks!

  3. Vincent Eggleston Jr

    On December 1, 2010 at 12:45 am


    good read

  4. strategy03

    On December 1, 2010 at 1:48 am


    Great writing. I like this

  5. Anuradha Ramkumar

    On December 1, 2010 at 1:53 am


    That was a gr8 share. I love constructive feedback.

  6. BruceW

    On December 1, 2010 at 8:06 am


    Found it a bit overly academic in style. I assumed from the title that you would give actual real examples of good and bad ways to give feedback, but instead you just listed things to consider. It would have been more useful to give a series of examples and discuss why each was good or bad.

  7. awesome11

    On December 1, 2010 at 11:47 am


    great share! thanks!

  8. UNMESH

    On December 1, 2010 at 12:05 pm


    nice dear

  9. PSingh1990

    On December 1, 2010 at 1:44 pm


    Nice Share.

    :-)

  10. Goodselfme

    On December 1, 2010 at 8:01 pm


    Well articulated feedback info. thank you.

  11. papaleng

    On December 2, 2010 at 2:29 am


    well-presented article.

  12. LCM Linda

    On December 7, 2010 at 12:06 am


    Giving correct feedback in a nice and effective manner is really important. Unfortunately, not many people bother to fine-tune this art.

  13. Brewed Coffee

    On February 2, 2011 at 1:43 am


    Feedback is an essential thing that could spell the difference between success and total disaster. How it is delivered is just as important. Great discussion here, Chris

  14. Jo Oliver

    On January 28, 2012 at 4:02 am


    I found this article spot on. FRrom the workplace setting, I’ve seen far to many accidents and errors happen simply because tje cjain of communication is broken, and that break is usually connected to feedback on some way or another. I had a nurse working under me that all the other floor nurses knew was halfaxx doing her wound care. Instead of them given higher-ups, like myself, a clue or trying to give her some direct constructive critisism, they ignored it. A lot of damage could have been avooided if these nurses wouldnt have ran fron conflict. Thought provoking article for us all.

  15. Jo Oliver

    On January 28, 2012 at 4:03 am


    I found this article spot on. FRrom the workplace setting, I’ve seen far to many accidents and errors happen simply because tje cjain of communication is broken, and that break is usually connected to feedback on some way or another. I had a nurse working under me that all the other floor nurses knew was halfaxx doing her wound care. Instead of them given higher-ups, like myself, a clue or trying to give her some direct constructive critisism, they ignored it. A lot of damage could have been avooided if these nurses wouldnt have ran fron conflict. Thought provoking article for us all.

  16. Jo Oliver

    On January 28, 2012 at 4:04 am


    I found this article spot on. FRrom the workplace setting, I’ve seen far to many accidents and errors happen simply because tje cjain of communication is broken, and that break is usually connected to feedback on some way or another. I had a nurse working under me that all the other floor nurses knew was halfaxx doing her wound care. Instead of them given higher-ups, like myself, a clue or trying to give her some direct constructive critisism, they ignored it. A lot of damage could have been avooided if these nurses wouldnt have ran fron conflict. Thought provoking article for us all.

  17. Jo Oliver

    On January 28, 2012 at 4:04 am


    I found this article spot on. FRrom the workplace setting, I’ve seen far to many accidents and errors happen simply because tje cjain of communication is broken, and that break is usually connected to feedback on some way or another. I had a nurse working under me that all the other floor nurses knew was halfaxx doing her wound care. Instead of them given higher-ups, like myself, a clue or trying to give her some direct constructive critisism, they ignored it. A lot of damage could have been avooided if these nurses wouldnt have ran fron conflict. Thought provoking article for us all.

  18. Jo Oliver

    On January 28, 2012 at 4:10 am


    I agree, a very important topic. I would add that i think we are aall too often very quick to point out flaws, but not so quick to ppoint out whats right. A perfect ex is food service..ppl quickly raise hell about bad service, but rarely call a manager or corp to report A plus service. That said, delivery of good or bad feedbackk is essential to how its recieved.

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