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Facts and Guides for Employers in Hiring Disabled Employees

The United States Department of Labor (DOL) stated through its website that 21.1 percent of labor force participation comes from citizens who have disabilities. Reflecting on the present situation of most of the disabled workers, many might say that there are laws and policies that were created to protect the rights of such employees.

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The United States Department of Labor (DOL) stated through its website that 21.1 percent of labor force participation comes from citizens who have disabilities. Reflecting on the present situation of most of the disabled workers, many might say that there are laws and policies that were created to protect the rights of such employees.

However, there are still numerous abusive employers who violate such people even though they know that they are highly at risk of being heavily reprimanded.

To provide an example, it would be fitting to cite the State of California, specifically the City of Los Angeles, which is well known as a center for business and trade.

Being a central business district, Los Angeles faces both advantages and disadvantages since its government may find it difficult to control the state of employment in the area.

Employers may also find it difficult to know the disability laws that they should follow to ensure disabled applicants and employees of their rights.  With that, it would be applicable to hire the services of a Los Angeles employment lawyer to be given proper advice and insights of the complex litigation terms and processes surrounding the disability policies.

As stated on a survey conducted by the DOL and the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), some 2.4 million companies through the 12 sectors of the industry had raised certain questions regarding the hiring of an applicant with disability.  These include the following:

•    Are accommodations expensive?
•    Will my organization’s worker compensation and health care cost increase?
•    Can an employee with disability get the job done?
•    How will supervisors manage employees with disabilities?

Moreover, to further educate employers regarding the real definition of disability, the American Disability Act of 1990 (ADA) describes it as the mental and/or physical defect that limits primary activities. These activities include speaking, walking, thinking, hearing, breathing, or doing tasks that require manual labor. In addition, the job that the disabled applicant must seek is that of which he or she could do without any help.

Conversely, those with disabilities are protected by the laws from experiencing discriminatory acts that would degrade them within certain employment processes. These employment aspects include the following:

•    Application
•    Salaries
•    Leave
•    Benefits
•    Hiring
•    Promotions
•    Training

In addition is harassment since it is also an act that violates the rights of employees and has a similar nature to that of discrimination; the two are often viewed as one. But this should not be the case, since harassment happens on a personal level while discrimination occurs on the processes of employment.

Disabled employees may ask for “reasonable accommodations” from employers though the law does not require the latter if such accommodations interfere with the specifics of the business. Reasonable accommodations are executed by making adjustments for the employee in order for him or her to perform certain functions immediately.

An example of this is through installing comfort room facilities within the office to accommodate those who have disabilities. Other samples include purchasing a computer with a pre installed Braille system and recordings for blind employees.

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