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Welfare And Its Major Problems

The reason welfare is a bad idea.

Get a job, thats what I say to people who live

on welfare, besides elderly and handicapped people. What is America going to come to if people

always have to live on welfare.

In case you did not know, welfare is economics concerned with better living.

the branch of economics that is concerned with improving the quality of life

by a fairer distribution of wealth.

Although welfare is not a very fair distribution because those who work have to

pay for those who don’t.

Does that sound fair?

Basically this means that you pay welfare taxes and people who dont have a job get it.

This means that if someone dosn’t feel like getting a job, tax payers like you pay for

his living.

That is the most absurd thing I have ever heard of.

I think that if you do not work you should not eat.

But some people do not think so, like the government.

Eventually this is going to cause economic problems.

And should be addressed immediately.

There are many taxes such as these and more of them are coming.

I believe America is on a downfall and needs to be picked back up.

It is terrible how high taxes are getting.

There are many job opportunities for people to get jobs.

But like I said, they are just too lazy, or are not motivated enough.

And I am not talking about handicapped or elder people either.

But it is getting harder to get jobs in America because of immigrants.

America is hiring immigrants over American citizens.

This is because most immigrants work for cheaper than citizens.

This is going to destroy American economy.

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  1. Ryan

    On February 24, 2008 at 11:13 am


    This is seriously the worst argument i have every come across. “But like I said, they are just too lazy” What evidence do you have to prove this? “Eventually this is going to cause economic problems” Really? Like what? Give me one example. Welfare has been around for quite some time. Let me know when we hit that magical line that will spell economic doom. Even if I agreed with your stance I couldn’t make sense of your little blurb here.

  2. Jake marcob

    On February 24, 2008 at 1:40 pm


    If you have such a problem with this article then dont read it!
    this is only my personal opinion, isnt anyone aloud to state their opinion without being harassed, this is my only article that has over 100 veiws and I didnt think anyone would have such a big problem with it. I am not going to take it off triond Ryan.

  3. Jake marcob

    On February 24, 2008 at 1:42 pm


    Ryan, I have onley been on triond for a week for cryin out loud! a If you really want me to take this off triond or edit it then plz let me know.

  4. indigolexi

    On February 24, 2008 at 6:06 pm


    Ryan is probably on welfare himself. too lazy to do anything, sitting at home whining about EVERYTHING. I liked this and i sorta agree. Nice job
    ~ indigolexi

  5. Jake marcob

    On February 24, 2008 at 8:56 pm


    this article is only my personal opinion for goodness sake

  6. Jake marcob

    On February 24, 2008 at 9:01 pm


    plz do not comment this if you have a problem with this article.
    I am getting really annoyed with snobby comments.
    if you dont have anything nice to say then dont say anything at all

    ty for your cooperation .

  7. Tarra B.

    On February 25, 2008 at 3:46 pm


    I agree that there are some problems with the current welfare system. It’s a great program for people whom truly need it. The problem lies with the individuals whom abuse it.

  8. Cara Boynton

    On February 25, 2008 at 6:21 pm


    Yes, there is a problem, not all people who need it are lazy, or elderly or disabled. There are people who work, some have more than one job, but they just can’t make ends meet. Then, there are some who just flat out abuse the system. We must determine who needs it and who doesn’t. Just because someone is disabled doesn’t mean they get welfare. Disability and welfare are two entirely differnt things.

  9. Jake marcob

    On February 25, 2008 at 7:07 pm


    this article is aimed to those who abuse welfare

  10. mmmk

    On February 25, 2008 at 9:34 pm


    HAHAH welfare abuse takes me right back to the time when my cousins started abusing welfare benefits just because they didn’t feel like getting a job. They just wanted to sit around doing nothing with their lives… good times busting on my cousins

  11. Alexa Gates

    On March 2, 2008 at 9:00 am


    I agree with your point. I mean… there may be a shortage of jobs, but if you really wanted to a job to make some money you would work at a McDonalds or something instead of just moping around and living off welfare. Also, if we keep shilling out money to everyone who doesn’t have a job our economy (like you said) is going to go downhill. Just look at the Roman Empire and how it feel.. you make a logical argument!

  12. s. johnson

    On March 21, 2008 at 11:13 am


    don’t forget about the people who have hiddin disabilities such as autism or aspergers. also if we want more fully functioning adults maybe the government should stop poisining our food, water, & vaccines to make us sick duh. wake up everyone.usa is a fu*ked up place to be.

  13. KAREN MORTON

    On March 27, 2008 at 8:05 pm


    PLEASE CAN SOMEONE HELP ME ? I AM GOING TO DO A RESEARCH PAPER ON WELFARE AND I HAVE TO HAVE THREE POSITIONS YOU KNOW PROS AND CONS. I AM HAVING A HARD TIME COMING UP WITH A THIRD ONE. THANKS

  14. Maggie

    On May 5, 2008 at 11:31 am


    Welfare can have devasting effects on the ecomony. Notice how I used the word \\\\\\\”can\\\\\\\”! Our ecomony works when those who get the transfer payments put the funds back into the ecomony. Those who spend the money on drugs and things such as that really screws our ecomony. There are people who truly need the income however, there are those who really abuse the system.

  15. Matt

    On July 25, 2008 at 12:47 am


    Didn’t it cross your mind that a lot of the people on welfare would absolutely love to be able to work? Guess what, there aren’t any jobs to be had. I’m a college student, and I took this summer off to work and save some money. Guess what? No jobs. Even at McDonald’s, which in my opinion is a last resort kind of job, there are no employment opportunities. I’m really starting to wonder if I’m going to be able to use my degree when I finish college at all.
    And heres a little food for thought: you’d probably have to pay equivalent taxes whether America had a welfare program or not.

  16. jo oliver

    On August 16, 2008 at 11:15 pm


    Jake,
    Your points are well stated. I have a four yr old handicapped child ( can not walk, talk, or even hold her own head up) and I can verify that the majority of handicapped individuals are not getting SSI, much less welfare. I stay home with her 24/7 and my husband only makes 30k a yr, but we don’t qualify for any of the entitlement programs except a hundred dollar SSI check and Medicaid. WHY???…..because of the people that are not handicapped abusing the system. My child cant chew or swallow anything but pureed foods. It takes 300.00 a month just for her pureed baby food. I get so mad when I see some mama with 5 or 6 perfectly healthy kids and she is perfectly healthy, but she is paying with food stamps. If you cant afford to have 5 kids keep your legs closed or use contraception! Why should those truly unable to help themselves and have disablities that are beyond their control do without, while some ho lays on her back , refuses to work, or refuses to only have what she can afford? Thank you Jake for making this argument and opening a forum. We need to all become advocates for those need assistance for reasons beyond their control by ensuring those that those faking, refusing to work, choosing to cont. to have more than they can support, etc… are THROWN OFF THE SYSTEM!

  17. jo oliver

    On August 16, 2008 at 11:21 pm


    #15 by Matt, Jul 25, 2008

    You mean to tell me that the classifieds in your city was completely empty, the employment service office didnt have any jobs to offer, etc.. I think not. Even in the bo hick town that I live, there are jobs. All may not be what you WANT to do, but it is a pay check. Yes, you would still have to pay taxes, but the point is that the tax money could be given to those truely in need and thus spent on basic needs…instead of drugs, ethol, etc. Which would stimulate the economy….instead of further draining it. Also, those that are handicapped, elderly, and indigent could get the help….instead of the ho bag 6 baby mamas, drug heads, and lazy scum bags.

  18. REALITY CHECK

    On October 7, 2008 at 1:01 am


    Welfare is EVIL, this is true, however, i do not fault all the people that are taking advantage of the food stamps and SSI, because the goverment is perfectly happy to allow it to happen. The fact that people that deserver the service to not get it is ALARMING and TERRIBLE. To solve the problem the goverment has to intervene and say, listen, we cannot help you anymore, because you can and should be helping yourself.

  19. psu student

    On October 14, 2008 at 5:42 pm


    I agree with most of this article in the fact that many people DO abuse the welfare system. Most people are too lazy to lazy to go out and find jobs and when they do, are fired within the month for not showing up, being late, or not putting the effort into doing what they are being paid to do. I do believe that some people really do need welfare, in which I would not mind paying taxes for. Example: A woman who has a full time job and is doing everything she can to provide for her and her children but it still is not enough. I think welfare should be for people who physically or mentally cannot work (elderly or handicapped) and for people who have such low paying jobs that they cannot keep up with bills, inflation, and providing for their children. I do not tolerate people who try and ride the system, which is what most people who are on welfare are doing.

  20. welfarecon

    On February 23, 2009 at 9:07 pm


    i agree with ur statement you made very good argument. and for the people that say welfare helps people it actually does not. statistics show that families on welfare work 800 hours a year equivilent to 16 hours per week and if people on welfare simply raised their hours to 2,000 a year nearly 75 percent of children in poverty would be eliminated.

  21. dj

    On March 3, 2009 at 7:52 pm


    I agree with almost all of your article jake, it is ridiculous some people have to pay for other peoples drugs a lot of the times. Although the process at least where I live is a grueling process, it should be even harder. The people that need the welfare will truly get what they deserve and the people that dont will have to go get a jobs for their drugs and hookers.

  22. jalen jones

    On March 11, 2009 at 12:15 pm


    i think your right 100%. i think as well lazy people need to get up and get a job. cause when i grow up and get a job i aint paying for someone whos lazing.

  23. jwatanabe

    On March 16, 2009 at 11:09 am


    I totally agree with what you said. The general idea of welfare isn’t a bad thing, and it can help those who truly need it, like the elderly and handicapped, as you mentioned. However, most of the time the welfare system is abused. Many who are on welfare either refuse to get a job or have more kids in order in increase their welfare benefits. I mean, check out the now famous octo-mom. She isn’t on “welfare” per say, but if $490 in food stamps and thousands on disability support per month isn’t welfare, I don’t know what that is. I mean we are paying tons of money to support her crazy idea to have tons of children……by herself! I mean come on!

  24. jt

    On April 1, 2009 at 11:02 am


    I think,that the Hard Working,Tax Paying people of this country, show all stand up and start refusing to pay for this program! I have worked for over 30 years and my family has never been on welfare. but everyday i see people who are able to work, but refuse to do so. but yet they seem to have 2 or 3 shopping carts full of groc. while i stand in line with alittle a small amount of groc.these Fat Ass Slobs are stealing money away from those who really need it.Tax Payer of the U.S. it time to stand up and pull our head out of our Ass’s! and do something about it!

  25. jwatanabe

    On April 8, 2009 at 2:27 pm


    Well, yes I have posted before and I do agree for the most part with Jake Marcob. In fact, I am doing my senior thesis paper on the flaws of welfare. For some proof and empirical data about the flaws of welfare check out “http://www.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa-212.html” and “http://www.neoperspectives.com/welfare.htm”. There is some interesting and startling data on these sites.

  26. randy

    On April 17, 2009 at 4:20 am


    I’m also doing a research paper for high school on the flaws of welfare. I think the whole system needs to be reformed…again.

  27. ruthiee

    On April 28, 2009 at 11:23 am


    we have a high amount of people on unemployment simple because they have too much pride to take on a petty job making change from they are accustomed to making. let go of you pride and take your ass to work. any person that is able to work should. especially those single moms. they have best of both worlds. they qualify for day care assistance so there’s no reason for her a$$ to stay home but simple living off the system and just plain LAZY! the system is said to be a temporary fix but folks do abuse it and i can’t stand it. a mom who is already on the system should be BANNED for having any more children. they only do this to continue receiving benefits. shame on her. they make it harder for others, who really need to be in the system, to receive benefits. i have worked 2 jobs, in the last 6 years, raising 2 boys. do you think i qualify for $hit. not. i make to much money they say. i go to school as well at night and i refuse to go on the system to move to the bottom and get stuck. i want my kids to know that hard work pays off. so all the single moms out there, get your a$$ off to work, STOP opening your legs and having children you can’t afford, and blame yourself for your circumstance. take responsiblity for you action(s). if i was your case worker, i would have surveillance you and prove that you no longer qualify for services.

  28. ruthiee

    On April 28, 2009 at 11:26 am


    reform should have gone into effect a long time ago. every person on the system finds a loop hole to continue being on the system. fraudulant claims should be prosecuted!

  29. Cait

    On April 30, 2009 at 10:19 am


    You all bash welfare but I can not imagine that if anyone of you lost your job, fell ill, had your children fall ill, were somehow injured or for whatever reason could not make your monthly payments or buy food for you families, that you wouldn’t turn to the government for assistance. Welfare is set up for people in need because we, as citizens, have the right to security in the event of unemployment, disability, sickness or other uncontrollable events. Getting a job is often exactly what people on welfare would like to do. Not only does the program come with a strong social stigma, but the money you receive is not much for a high quality of life. The problem is that these people have children to raise or someone who is sick to care for, they often can not afford transportation or new clothing to look presentable for interviews. It not that easy to just get off your ass, walk out the door and look! a job! Especially now, companies are stingy with their hiring . Besides over half of the individuals receiving welfare are under the age of 18, should they too be left to fend for themselves?

  30. ruthiee

    On May 1, 2009 at 8:00 am


    yes, a person under the age of 18 shouldn’t be on welfare. he/she should be able to work. and for what reason brought them to welfare? now if you talking about a 18 yr woman who becomes a mom at 18, well, she should have opt to get an abortion and not depend on the system for financial need. i am a single mom of 2 boys and receive no child support. i went for aide and you know what they told me, i made over $100.00 more than their need basis. WTF! i have worked since i was in high school and at that time i was in my late 20s. AND if you really wanted to work, one can borrow someone elses clothes just for the interview and look presentable. people who take these programs know what they are getting themselves into. they know that they will not be able to live like kings but are because they are not doing anything damn thing to get out.

  31. Stopid Monkey

    On May 7, 2009 at 8:29 am


    You guys have no life i have to do this for school

  32. ruthiee

    On May 11, 2009 at 8:21 am


    you must be part of the system Kelli to say such thing. get rid of welfare for the mother’s who abuse the system.

  33. sophia

    On October 7, 2009 at 8:38 pm


    I agree with you 100% and I always would argue with everyone about this before i even came across your article. I do believe though that we should contribute the tax money from welfare to creating more programs to help people who have hit rock bottom to get back on their feet and to gain skills to find a job. We should also contibute the taxes to creating more school programs for kids who arent great in academics but would find interest in other things.

  34. Ashley

    On October 18, 2009 at 7:08 pm


    This is the most retarded, single minded argument I have ever read. Have u ever known anyone who had to take care of family memebers due to death or negligence? Well sometimes people end up taking care of others and being so overwhelmed with responsibility, that they cannot work. YES…This does count because these people taking care of friends, family members, and especially children who are too busy to work collect welfare. If there were no one to take care of these sick or abonded people, they would go into the hands of the government system. Meaning foster care, nursing homes, hospice care…well the Government pays a lot more towards that, then to a person on welfare. So take that into consideration before expressing your “Expert Opinion”, or as I call it, “Wasting Oxygen.”

  35. Charli

    On November 11, 2009 at 1:19 pm


    We are poisoning ourselves. We all Know (deep within ourselves) that this is wrong. Its a nice principal you know take care of those who cant help themselves. The problem is that we are enableing the behavior that causes this. Those people who will have another child to stay on welfare, were those who dressed better than i did when i was in school, were on welfare. Many people on welfare do not have the responsibility to wipe their own asses, much less the want to get off of it. Yes it is a wonderful cushion for someone who fell hard and needs some help getting back up on their feet (im not arguing that).
    Why should we hold so many people up above the water, we are only drowning ourselves. The only society that welfare should be allowed to exist in would be communism. The only difference is that with communism you are given a job to pay back in work what you are given. So what does that make us? Socialists? Where everyone is taxed so heavily to take care of everyone else?
    This is NOT America, we are supposed to be a democracy where those who were oppressed can now find decent jobs making a decent living, that does not mean keep the immigrants out, that means work and work hard. Do not turn your nose up at Burger King workers, at least they have a job and are motivated enough to go to work and earn a decent wage. We Americans need a slap in the face to wake up and smell the roses. We are not so high and mighty, we are actually falling apart and are too blind to see it.

  36. Danita

    On November 22, 2009 at 6:09 pm


    my name is danita. i have been on both sides of the fence. my family has been on welfare way longer than i have even been alive nd they are still on welfare. my father never made it past 8th grade nd my mom had 8 children. BUT I DID NOT CHOOSE TO DO THE SAME…

    im graduating from college in 2 yrs with my MASTERS DEGREE in social work and i am not on welfare. in fact i have had a job since i was 14. so yes i think ppl should work if they are able to do so BUT i dont think welfare is a bad thing. however, instead of giving ppl a fat welfare check, they should not give anyone cash assistance but instead use the money to increase minimum wage to $12 a hour so that people can afford to take care of themselves.

    so as u can see, not everyone on welfare is lazy. i got off it as soon as i turned 18 and now i dont mind paying taxes for ppl who need welfare because i know what its like to be in their shoes. nd besides, even if welfare is eliminated completely, YOU ARE STILL GOING TO HAVE TO PAY THE SAME AMOUNT IN TAXES. UR TAXES ARE NOT GOING TO LOWER. so thats not a good argument.

  37. C

    On December 9, 2009 at 5:45 pm


    Do you think people care that much if they have to pay taxes? Yeah we are always going to have to pay them. They are arguing that they don’t want their tax money going to people who don’t deserve it duh.

  38. Andrew

    On December 14, 2009 at 1:17 am


    This argument is absolutely ridiculous. Obviously Jake Marcob hasn’t read about the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, which requires most people to get a job, do community service, or go into job training while on welfare AND limits the number of checks they get. The welfare program was created to avoid the horrific social conditions of another economic depression, and those of you who have read the Grapes of Wrath know what I mean. The huge number of grammatical errors alone tell me that this Jake Marcob character is not a highly educated person. Anyone with a worthy argument would support it with factual evidence. I agree with the first comment by ryan.

  39. jake

    On February 22, 2010 at 8:40 pm


    yeah same here stopid monkey!!

  40. Colby

    On March 14, 2010 at 11:25 pm


    Ok Ryan, ….. our countrys in great shape. Its not like we have a debt of 14 trillion or nothing. Thats just pocket change. We\\\\\\\’ll get it paid off in no time. Hahahahahah

    When we are 14 trillion dollars in debt, we are not going to be able to pay for anything. No schools, no welfare, no disability, nothing. Those who are on disability will be the ones who have nothing to eat when this country gets rough and can\\\\\\\’t pay for those things. We won\\\\\\\’t even be able to support the US military when we go broke. We will then be in service to all the countrys that we owe debt to. That will go over well with China. Communist!!!! But yeah man we\\\\\\\’ve had welfare since 1933 and it hasn\\\\\\\’t failed us yet.

  41. Colby

    On March 14, 2010 at 11:25 pm


    Ok Ryan, ….. our countrys in great shape. Its not like we have a debt of 14 trillion or nothing. Thats just pocket change. We\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’ll get it paid off in no time. Hahahahahah

    When we are 14 trillion dollars in debt, we are not going to be able to pay for anything. No schools, no welfare, no disability, nothing. Those who are on disability will be the ones who have nothing to eat when this country gets rough and can\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’t pay for those things. We won\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’t even be able to support the US military when we go broke. We will then be in service to all the countrys that we owe debt to. That will go over well with China. Communist!!!! But yeah man we\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’ve had welfare since 1933 and it hasn\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’t failed us yet.

  42. Kate Gosselin

    On March 22, 2010 at 12:03 pm


    lalalalalala

  43. Michael

    On April 13, 2010 at 12:15 am


    This is a great point of view, just a bit flawed. welfare is a great oppurtunity for people who truly deserve it. Those who simply abuse the system are leeches that drain honest, hard working american’s money! Welfare needs to be limited in nature, less spending and more responsibility. Living in the USA is a privilage, you do not have a god- given right to live here. Cut welfare except to those who need it! Force those who have been unemployed for five years to get off their butts and get a job. The more we complain about how everyone just hates me and i have no oppurtunity is just bull s**t, pardon my french. We are the UNITED states, and we can only be united if we are all on the same page!

  44. Deanna

    On April 19, 2010 at 4:05 pm


    I’m against welfare as well , but this argument is just rude….

  45. febe

    On April 22, 2010 at 1:56 pm


    I agree with what you have written, it just make me mad that a portion of what we make goes to some of the people who are to lazy to work and we give them money.

  46. Ron F.

    On June 7, 2010 at 6:43 pm


    by Lou Smith
    Central Christian Observer Vol. 2, Number 7, July 1996

    Any cursory review of this issue has to conclude that we have to change welfare as we know it. We simply cannot continue to handle this problem as we have in the past. Having established this as a premise, what does the Bible reveal about this critical matter? Can we discharge our responsibilities to the poor by personal charitable action or through supporting the humanitarian (i.e. welfare) policies of the State? President Lyndon Johnson’s “war on poverty” is now into its third decade and there is ample evidence of its abysmal failure. Can we translate the advice given in the Bible as far back as 3,000 years ago into terms relative to the doing of God’s work in the late twentieth century?

    Matthew 26:11 says, “For the poor you have with you always…” Does this mean we should just shrug our shoulders? Absolutely not! Welfare warrants Christian attention! We need to get our government out of the welfare role and put the Church (back) in it!

    Jesus Christ modeled a life and ministry of compassion to the poor. He mingled with them (Luke 5:1-11), ate with them (Luke 5:27-32), comforted them (Luke 12:22-34), fed them (Luke 9:10-17), healed them (Luke 5:12-16), and ministered them (Luke 7:18-23). Should not those who are called to “conform themselves to His image” (Romans 8:29) place a high priority on the care of the poor?

    Read the verses regarding Tabitha, a Godly women whose chief occupation was helping the poor as stated in Acts 9:36-41. In Acts 4:36-37, we read of Barnabas leaving an indelible mark on the early Christian communities by supplying the needs of the poor and, later in Acts 11:27-30, spearheading relief efforts and taking up collections for famine-stricken Judeans. In II Corinthians 8:3-6, we find Titus organizing a collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem. Later, he oversaw relief efforts in Corinth (II Corinthians 8-9). The Apostle Paul was committed to “remembering the poor” (Galatians 2:7-10). He began his ministry as a poverty outreach (Acts 11:27-30) and coordinated the resources of churches in Greece and Macedonia for relief purposes (II Corinthians 8-9).

    We’ve all read the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37, where Jesus tells of a Samaritan who stepped in after the “righteous” men sidestepped their charitable responsibilities. He admonishes us to likewise shed our religious front, letting our actions reflect our true spiritual character. We are to look after orphans and widows in their distress (Luke 3:7-11), and we are told that true repentance is evidenced in sharing food and sustenance with the poor. Selfless giving is honored and blessed (Luke 6:38 and II Corinthians 9:6-8); a sign of genuine faith (James 2:14-17).

    God Himself is a cheerful giver and promises to repay any kindness shown to His children with abundance and blessing. Proverbs 14:21 tells us we will be happy if we are kind and generous to the poor. In Psalm 41:1-2 we read, “How blessed is he who considers the helpless; the Lord will deliver him in a day of trouble. The Lord will protect him, and keep him alive, and he shall be called blessed upon the earth.” Proverbs 11:25 states, “The generous man will be prosperous and he who waters will himself be watered.” However, equal to God’s joy over our generosity, is His distress when respond out of selfishness.

    “He who oppresses the poor, reproaches his Maker, but he who is gracious to the needy honors Him,” says Proverbs 14:31. And, in Proverbs 28:27 we are warned that, “He who gives to the poor will never want, but he who shuts his eyes will have many curses.”

    I’ve only scratched the surface, but I’ve not found any evidence that we, as Christians, should abdicate our responsibilities to the government. I believe we’ve already done that and are now paying the price for this omission. The government will default or tax us even more heavily. It can be successfully argued that we should reclaim our responsibility and get the government out of the welfare business. It has been stated many times recently, that we don’t have a fiscal problem – we have a spiritual problem.

  47. Ron F.

    On June 7, 2010 at 6:44 pm


    by Lou Smith
    Central Christian Observer Vol. 2, Number 7, July 1996

    Any cursory review of this issue has to conclude that we have to change welfare as we know it. We simply cannot continue to handle this problem as we have in the past. Having established this as a premise, what does the Bible reveal about this critical matter? Can we discharge our responsibilities to the poor by personal charitable action or through supporting the humanitarian (i.e. welfare) policies of the State? President Lyndon Johnson\’s \”war on poverty\” is now into its third decade and there is ample evidence of its abysmal failure. Can we translate the advice given in the Bible as far back as 3,000 years ago into terms relative to the doing of God\’s work in the late twentieth century?

    Matthew 26:11 says, \”For the poor you have with you always…\” Does this mean we should just shrug our shoulders? Absolutely not! Welfare warrants Christian attention! We need to get our government out of the welfare role and put the Church (back) in it!

    Jesus Christ modeled a life and ministry of compassion to the poor. He mingled with them (Luke 5:1-11), ate with them (Luke 5:27-32), comforted them (Luke 12:22-34), fed them (Luke 9:10-17), healed them (Luke 5:12-16), and ministered them (Luke 7:18-23). Should not those who are called to \”conform themselves to His image\” (Romans 8:29) place a high priority on the care of the poor?

    Read the verses regarding Tabitha, a Godly women whose chief occupation was helping the poor as stated in Acts 9:36-41. In Acts 4:36-37, we read of Barnabas leaving an indelible mark on the early Christian communities by supplying the needs of the poor and, later in Acts 11:27-30, spearheading relief efforts and taking up collections for famine-stricken Judeans. In II Corinthians 8:3-6, we find Titus organizing a collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem. Later, he oversaw relief efforts in Corinth (II Corinthians 8-9). The Apostle Paul was committed to \”remembering the poor\” (Galatians 2:7-10). He began his ministry as a poverty outreach (Acts 11:27-30) and coordinated the resources of churches in Greece and Macedonia for relief purposes (II Corinthians 8-9).

    We\’ve all read the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37, where Jesus tells of a Samaritan who stepped in after the \”righteous\” men sidestepped their charitable responsibilities. He admonishes us to likewise shed our religious front, letting our actions reflect our true spiritual character. We are to look after orphans and widows in their distress (Luke 3:7-11), and we are told that true repentance is evidenced in sharing food and sustenance with the poor. Selfless giving is honored and blessed (Luke 6:38 and II Corinthians 9:6-8); a sign of genuine faith (James 2:14-17).

    God Himself is a cheerful giver and promises to repay any kindness shown to His children with abundance and blessing. Proverbs 14:21 tells us we will be happy if we are kind and generous to the poor. In Psalm 41:1-2 we read, \”How blessed is he who considers the helpless; the Lord will deliver him in a day of trouble. The Lord will protect him, and keep him alive, and he shall be called blessed upon the earth.\” Proverbs 11:25 states, \”The generous man will be prosperous and he who waters will himself be watered.\” However, equal to God\’s joy over our generosity, is His distress when respond out of selfishness.

    \”He who oppresses the poor, reproaches his Maker, but he who is gracious to the needy honors Him,\” says Proverbs 14:31. And, in Proverbs 28:27 we are warned that, \”He who gives to the poor will never want, but he who shuts his eyes will have many curses.\”

    I have only scratched the surface, but I’ve not found any evidence that we, as Christians, should abdicate our responsibilities to the government. I believe we’ve already done that and are now paying the price for this omission. The government will default or tax us even more heavily. It can be successfully argued that we should reclaim our responsibility and get the government out of the welfare business. It has been stated many times recently, that we don\’t have a fiscal problem – we have a spiritual problem.

  48. Ron F.

    On June 7, 2010 at 6:47 pm


    by Lou Smith
    Central Christian Observer Vol. 2, Number 7, July 1996

    Any cursory review of this issue has to conclude that we have to change welfare as we know it. We simply cannot continue to handle this problem as we have in the past. Having established this as a premise, what does the Bible reveal about this critical matter? Can we discharge our responsibilities to the poor by personal charitable action or through supporting the humanitarian (i.e. welfare) policies of the State? President Lyndon Johnson’s “war on poverty” is now into its third decade and there is ample evidence of its abysmal failure. Can we translate the advice given in the Bible as far back as 3,000 years ago into terms relative to the doing of God’s work in the late twentieth century?

    Matthew 26:11 says, “For the poor you have with you always…” Does this mean we should just shrug our shoulders? Absolutely not! Welfare warrants Christian attention! We need to get our government out of the welfare role and put the Church (back) in it!

    Jesus Christ modeled a life and ministry of compassion to the poor. He mingled with them (Luke 5:1-11), ate with them (Luke 5:27-32), comforted them (Luke 12:22-34), fed them (Luke 9:10-17), healed them (Luke 5:12-16), and ministered them (Luke 7:18-23). Should not those who are called to “conform themselves to His image” (Romans 8:29) place a high priority on the care of the poor?

    Read the verses regarding Tabitha, a Godly women whose chief occupation was helping the poor as stated in Acts 9:36-41. In Acts 4:36-37, we read of Barnabas leaving an indelible mark on the early Christian communities by supplying the needs of the poor and, later in Acts 11:27-30, spearheading relief efforts and taking up collections for the famine-stricken. In II Corinthians 8:3-6, we find Titus organizing a collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem. Later, he oversaw relief efforts in Corinth (II Corinthians 8-9). The Apostle Paul was committed to “remembering the poor” (Galatians 2:7-10). He began his ministry as a poverty outreach (Acts 11:27-30) and coordinated the resources of churches in Greece and Macedonia for relief purposes (II Corinthians 8-9).

    We’ve all read the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37, where Jesus tells of a Samaritan who stepped in after the “righteous” men sidestepped their charitable responsibilities. He admonishes us to likewise shed our religious front, letting our actions reflect our true spiritual character. We are to look after orphans and widows in their distress (Luke 3:7-11), and we are told that true repentance is evidenced in sharing food and sustenance with the poor. Selfless giving is honored and blessed (Luke 6:38 and II Corinthians 9:6-8); a sign of genuine faith (James 2:14-17).

    God Himself is a cheerful giver and promises to repay any kindness shown to His children with abundance and blessing. Proverbs 14:21 tells us we will be happy if we are kind and generous to the poor. In Psalm 41:1-2 we read, “How blessed is he who considers the helpless; the Lord will deliver him in a day of trouble. The Lord will protect him, and keep him alive, and he shall be called blessed upon the earth.” Proverbs 11:25 states, “The generous man will be prosperous and he who waters will himself be watered.” However, equal to God’s joy over our generosity, is His distress when respond out of selfishness.

    “He who oppresses the poor, reproaches his Maker, but he who is gracious to the needy honors Him,” says Proverbs 14:31. And, in Proverbs 28:27 we are warned that, “He who gives to the poor will never want, but he who shuts his eyes will have many curses.”

    I have only scratched the surface, but I’ve not found any evidence that we, as Christians, should abdicate our responsibilities to the government. I believe we’ve already done that and are now paying the price for this omission. The government will default or tax us even more heavily. It can be successfully argued that we should reclaim our responsibility and get the government out of the welfare business. It has been stated many times recently, that we don’t have a fiscal problem – we have a spiritual problem.

  49. Ron F.

    On June 7, 2010 at 6:49 pm


    by Lou Smith
    Central Christian Observer Vol. 2, Number 7, July 1996

    Any cursory review of this issue has to conclude that we have to change welfare as we know it. We simply cannot continue to handle this problem as we have in the past. Having established this as a premise, what does the Bible reveal about this critical matter? Can we discharge our responsibilities to the poor by personal charitable action or through supporting the humanitarian (i.e. welfare) policies of the State? President Lyndon Johnson’s “war on poverty” is now into its third decade and there is ample evidence of its abysmal failure. Can we translate the advice given in the Bible as far back as 3,000 years ago into terms relative to the doing of God’s work in the late twentieth century?

    Matthew 26:11 says, “For the poor you have with you always…” Does this mean we should just shrug our shoulders? Absolutely not! Welfare warrants Christian attention! We need to get our government out of the welfare role and put the Church (back) in it!

    Jesus Christ modeled a life and ministry of compassion to the poor. He mingled with them (Luke 5:1-11), ate with them (Luke 5:27-32), comforted them (Luke 12:22-34), fed them (Luke 9:10-17), healed them (Luke 5:12-16), and ministered them (Luke 7:18-23). Should not those who are called to “conform themselves to His image” (Romans 8:29) place a high priority on the care of the poor?

    Read the verses regarding Tabitha, a Godly women whose chief occupation was helping the poor as stated in Acts 9:36-41. In Acts 4:36-37, we read of Barnabas leaving an indelible mark on the early Christian communities by supplying the needs of the poor and, later in Acts 11:27-30, spearheading relief efforts and taking up collections for famine-stricken Judeans. In II Corinthians 8:3-6, we find Titus organizing a collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem. Later, he oversaw relief efforts in Corinth (II Corinthians 8-9). The Apostle Paul was committed to “remembering the poor” (Galatians 2:7-10). He began his ministry as a poverty outreach (Acts 11:27-30) and coordinated the resources of churches in Greece and Macedonia for relief purposes (II Corinthians 8-9).

    We’ve all read the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37, where Jesus tells of a Samaritan who stepped in after the “righteous” men sidestepped their charitable responsibilities. He admonishes us to likewise shed our religious front, letting our actions reflect our true spiritual character. We are to look after orphans and widows in their distress (Luke 3:7-11), and we are told that true repentance is evidenced in sharing food and sustenance with the poor. Selfless giving is honored and blessed (Luke 6:38 and II Corinthians 9:6-8); a sign of genuine faith (James 2:14-17).

    God Himself is a cheerful giver and promises to repay any kindness shown to His children with abundance and blessing. Proverbs 14:21 tells us we will be happy if we are kind and generous to the poor. In Psalm 41:1-2 we read, “How blessed is he who considers the helpless; the Lord will deliver him in a day of trouble. The Lord will protect him, and keep him alive, and he shall be called blessed upon the earth.” Proverbs 11:25 states, “The generous man will be prosperous and he who waters will himself be watered.” However, equal to God’s joy over our generosity, is His distress when respond out of selfishness.

    “He who oppresses the poor, reproaches his Maker, but he who is gracious to the needy honors Him,” says Proverbs 14:31. And, in Proverbs 28:27 we are warned that, “He who gives to the poor will never want, but he who shuts his eyes will have many curses.”

    I’ve only scratched the surface, but I’ve not found any evidence that we, as Christians, should abdicate our responsibilities to the government. I believe we’ve already done that and are now paying the price for this omission. The government will default or tax us even more heavily. It can be successfully argued that we should reclaim our responsibility and get the government out of the welfare business. It has been stated many times recently, that we don’t have a fiscal problem – we have a spiritual problem.

  50. Ron F.

    On June 7, 2010 at 6:49 pm


    by Lou Smith
    Central Christian Observer Vol. 2, Number 7, July 1996

    Any cursory review of this issue has to conclude that we have to change welfare as we know it. We simply cannot continue to handle this problem as we have in the past. Having established this as a premise, what does the Bible reveal about this critical matter? Can we discharge our responsibilities to the poor by personal charitable action or through supporting the humanitarian (i.e. welfare) policies of the State? President Lyndon Johnson\’s \”war on poverty\” is now into its third decade and there is ample evidence of its abysmal failure. Can we translate the advice given in the Bible as far back as 3,000 years ago into terms relative to the doing of God\’s work in the late twentieth century?

    Matthew 26:11 says, \”For the poor you have with you always…\” Does this mean we should just shrug our shoulders? Absolutely not! Welfare warrants Christian attention! We need to get our government out of the welfare role and put the Church (back) in it!

    Jesus Christ modeled a life and ministry of compassion to the poor. He mingled with them (Luke 5:1-11), ate with them (Luke 5:27-32), comforted them (Luke 12:22-34), fed them (Luke 9:10-17), healed them (Luke 5:12-16), and ministered them (Luke 7:18-23). Should not those who are called to \”conform themselves to His image\” (Romans 8:29) place a high priority on the care of the poor?

    Read the verses regarding Tabitha, a Godly women whose chief occupation was helping the poor as stated in Acts 9:36-41. In Acts 4:36-37, we read of Barnabas leaving an indelible mark on the early Christian communities by supplying the needs of the poor and, later in Acts 11:27-30, spearheading relief efforts and taking up collections for the famine-stricken. In II Corinthians 8:3-6, we find Titus organizing a collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem. Later, he oversaw relief efforts in Corinth (II Corinthians 8-9). The Apostle Paul was committed to \”remembering the poor\” (Galatians 2:7-10). He began his ministry as a poverty outreach (Acts 11:27-30) and coordinated the resources of churches in Greece and Macedonia for relief purposes (II Corinthians 8-9).

    We\’ve all read the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37, where Jesus tells of a Samaritan who stepped in after the \”righteous\” men sidestepped their charitable responsibilities. He admonishes us to likewise shed our religious front, letting our actions reflect our true spiritual character. We are to look after orphans and widows in their distress (Luke 3:7-11), and we are told that true repentance is evidenced in sharing food and sustenance with the poor. Selfless giving is honored and blessed (Luke 6:38 and II Corinthians 9:6-8); a sign of genuine faith (James 2:14-17).

    God Himself is a cheerful giver and promises to repay any kindness shown to His children with abundance and blessing. Proverbs 14:21 tells us we will be happy if we are kind and generous to the poor. In Psalm 41:1-2 we read, \”How blessed is he who considers the helpless; the Lord will deliver him in a day of trouble. The Lord will protect him, and keep him alive, and he shall be called blessed upon the earth.\” Proverbs 11:25 states, \”The generous man will be prosperous and he who waters will himself be watered.\” However, equal to God\’s joy over our generosity, is His distress when respond out of selfishness.

    \”He who oppresses the poor, reproaches his Maker, but he who is gracious to the needy honors Him,\” says Proverbs 14:31. And, in Proverbs 28:27 we are warned that, \”He who gives to the poor will never want, but he who shuts his eyes will have many curses.\”

    I\’ve only scratched the surface, but I\’ve not found any evidence that we, as Christians, should abdicate our responsibilities to the government. I believe we\’ve already done that and are now paying the price for this omission. The government will default or tax us even more heavily. It can be successfully argued that we should reclaim our responsibility and get the government out of the welfare business. It has been stated many times recently, that we don\’t have a fiscal problem – we have a spiritual problem.

  51. Ron F.

    On June 7, 2010 at 6:50 pm


    by Lou Smith
    Central Christian Observer Vol. 2, Number 7, July 1996

    Any cursory review of this issue has to conclude that we have to change welfare as we know it. We simply cannot continue to handle this problem as we have in the past. Having established this as a premise, what does the Bible reveal about this critical matter? Can we discharge our responsibilities to the poor by personal charitable action or through supporting the humanitarian (i.e. welfare) policies of the State? President Lyndon Johnson\\\’s \\\”war on poverty\\\” is now into its third decade and there is ample evidence of its abysmal failure. Can we translate the advice given in the Bible as far back as 3,000 years ago into terms relative to the doing of God\\\’s work in the late twentieth century?

    Matthew 26:11 says, \\\”For the poor you have with you always…\\\” Does this mean we should just shrug our shoulders? Absolutely not! Welfare warrants Christian attention! We need to get our government out of the welfare role and put the Church (back) in it!

    Jesus Christ modeled a life and ministry of compassion to the poor. He mingled with them (Luke 5:1-11), ate with them (Luke 5:27-32), comforted them (Luke 12:22-34), fed them (Luke 9:10-17), healed them (Luke 5:12-16), and ministered them (Luke 7:18-23). Should not those who are called to \\\”conform themselves to His image\\\” (Romans 8:29) place a high priority on the care of the poor?

    Read the verses regarding Tabitha, a Godly women whose chief occupation was helping the poor as stated in Acts 9:36-41. In Acts 4:36-37, we read of Barnabas leaving an indelible mark on the early Christian communities by supplying the needs of the poor and, later in Acts 11:27-30, spearheading relief efforts and taking up collections for the famine-stricken. In II Corinthians 8:3-6, we find Titus organizing a collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem. Later, he oversaw relief efforts in Corinth (II Corinthians 8-9). The Apostle Paul was committed to \\\”remembering the poor\\\” (Galatians 2:7-10). He began his ministry as a poverty outreach (Acts 11:27-30) and coordinated the resources of churches in Greece and Macedonia for relief purposes (II Corinthians 8-9).

    We’ve all read the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37, where Jesus tells of a Samaritan who stepped in after the \\\”righteous\\\” men sidestepped their charitable responsibilities. He admonishes us to likewise shed our religious front, letting our actions reflect our true spiritual character. We are to look after orphans and widows in their distress (Luke 3:7-11), and we are told that true repentance is evidenced in sharing food and sustenance with the poor. Selfless giving is honored and blessed (Luke 6:38 and II Corinthians 9:6-8); a sign of genuine faith (James 2:14-17).

    God Himself is a cheerful giver and promises to repay any kindness shown to His children with abundance and blessing. Proverbs 14:21 tells us we will be happy if we are kind and generous to the poor. In Psalm 41:1-2 we read, \\\”How blessed is he who considers the helpless; the Lord will deliver him in a day of trouble. The Lord will protect him, and keep him alive, and he shall be called blessed upon the earth.\\\” Proverbs 11:25 states, \\\”The generous man will be prosperous and he who waters will himself be watered.\\\” However, equal to God\\\’s joy over our generosity, is His distress when respond out of selfishness.

    \\\”He who oppresses the poor, reproaches his Maker, but he who is gracious to the needy honors Him,\\\” says Proverbs 14:31. And, in Proverbs 28:27 we are warned that, \\\”He who gives to the poor will never want, but he who shuts his eyes will have many curses.\\\”

    I\\\’ve only scratched the surface, but I\\\’ve not found any evidence that we, as Christians, should abdicate our responsibilities to the government. I believe we\\\’ve already done that and are now paying the price for this omission. The government will default or tax us even more heavily. It can be successfully argued that we should reclaim our responsibility and get the government out of the welfare business. It has been stated many times recently, that we don\\\’t have a fiscal problem – we have a spiritual problem.

  52. Ron F.

    On June 7, 2010 at 6:50 pm


    by Lou Smith
    Central Christian Observer Vol. 2, Number 7, July 1996

    Any cursory review of this issue has to conclude that we have to change welfare as we know it. We simply cannot continue to handle this problem as we have in the past. Having established this as a premise, what does the Bible reveal about this critical matter? Can we discharge our responsibilities to the poor by personal charitable action or through supporting the humanitarian (i.e. welfare) policies of the State? President Lyndon Johnson\\\\\\\’s \\\\\\\”war on poverty\\\\\\\” is now into its third decade and there is ample evidence of its abysmal failure. Can we translate the advice given in the Bible as far back as 3,000 years ago into terms relative to the doing of God\\\\\\\’s work in the late twentieth century?

    Matthew 26:11 says, \\\\\\\”For the poor you have with you always…\\\\\\\” Does this mean we should just shrug our shoulders? Absolutely not! Welfare warrants Christian attention! We need to get our government out of the welfare role and put the Church (back) in it!

    Jesus Christ modeled a life and ministry of compassion to the poor. He mingled with them (Luke 5:1-11), ate with them (Luke 5:27-32), comforted them (Luke 12:22-34), fed them (Luke 9:10-17), healed them (Luke 5:12-16), and ministered them (Luke 7:18-23). Should not those who are called to \\\\\\\”conform themselves to His image\\\\\\\” (Romans 8:29) place a high priority on the care of the poor?

    Read the verses regarding Tabitha, a Godly women whose chief occupation was helping the poor as stated in Acts 9:36-41. In Acts 4:36-37, we read of Barnabas leaving an indelible mark on the early Christian communities by supplying the needs of the poor and, later in Acts 11:27-30, spearheading relief efforts and taking up collections for the famine-stricken. In II Corinthians 8:3-6, we find Titus organizing a collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem. Later, he oversaw relief efforts in Corinth (II Corinthians 8-9). The Apostle Paul was committed to \\\\\\\”remembering the poor\\\\\\\” (Galatians 2:7-10). He began his ministry as a poverty outreach (Acts 11:27-30) and coordinated the resources of churches in Greece and Macedonia for relief purposes (II Corinthians 8-9).

    We\’ve all read the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37, where Jesus tells of a Samaritan who stepped in after the \\\\\\\”righteous\\\\\\\” men sidestepped their charitable responsibilities. He admonishes us to likewise shed our religious front, letting our actions reflect our true spiritual character. We are to look after orphans and widows in their distress (Luke 3:7-11), and we are told that true repentance is evidenced in sharing food and sustenance with the poor. Selfless giving is honored and blessed (Luke 6:38 and II Corinthians 9:6-8); a sign of genuine faith (James 2:14-17).

    God Himself is a cheerful giver and promises to repay any kindness shown to His children with abundance and blessing. Proverbs 14:21 tells us we will be happy if we are kind and generous to the poor. In Psalm 41:1-2 we read, \\\\\\\”How blessed is he who considers the helpless; the Lord will deliver him in a day of trouble. The Lord will protect him, and keep him alive, and he shall be called blessed upon the earth.\\\\\\\” Proverbs 11:25 states, \\\\\\\”The generous man will be prosperous and he who waters will himself be watered.\\\\\\\” However, equal to God\\\\\\\’s joy over our generosity, is His distress when respond out of selfishness.

    \\\\\\\”He who oppresses the poor, reproaches his Maker, but he who is gracious to the needy honors Him,\\\\\\\” says Proverbs 14:31. And, in Proverbs 28:27 we are warned that, \\\\\\\”He who gives to the poor will never want, but he who shuts his eyes will have many curses.\\\\\\\”

    I\\\\\\\’ve only scratched the surface, but I\\\\\\\’ve not found any evidence that we, as Christians, should abdicate our responsibilities to the government. I believe we’ve already done that and are now paying the price for this omission. The government will default or tax us even more heavily. It can be successfully argued that we should reclaim our responsibility and get the government out of the welfare business. It has been stated many times recently, that we don\\\\\\\’t have a fiscal problem – we have a spiritual problem.

  53. Ron F.

    On June 7, 2010 at 6:54 pm


    Any cursory review of this issue has to conclude that we have to change welfare as we know it. We simply cannot continue to handle this problem as we have in the past. Having established this as a premise, what does the Bible reveal about this critical matter? Can we discharge our responsibilities to the poor by personal charitable action or through supporting the humanitarian (i.e. welfare) policies of the State? President Lyndon Johnson’s “war on poverty” is now into its third decade and there is ample evidence of its abysmal failure. Can we translate the advice given in the Bible as far back as 3,000 years ago into terms relative to the doing of God’s work in the late twentieth century?

    Matthew 26:11 says, “For the poor you have with you always…” Does this mean we should just shrug our shoulders? Absolutely not! Welfare warrants Christian attention! We need to get our government out of the welfare role and put the Church (back) in it!

    Jesus Christ modeled a life and ministry of compassion to the poor. He mingled with them (Luke 5:1-11), ate with them (Luke 5:27-32), comforted them (Luke 12:22-34), fed them (Luke 9:10-17), healed them (Luke 5:12-16), and ministered them (Luke 7:18-23). Should not those who are called to “conform themselves to His image” (Romans 8:29) place a high priority on the care of the poor?

    Read the verses regarding Tabitha, a Godly women whose chief occupation was helping the poor as stated in Acts 9:36-41. In Acts 4:36-37, we read of Barnabas leaving an indelible mark on the early Christian communities by supplying the needs of the poor and, later in Acts 11:27-30, spearheading relief efforts and taking up collections for the famine-stricken. In II Corinthians 8:3-6, we find Titus organizing a collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem. Later, he oversaw relief efforts in Corinth (II Corinthians 8-9). The Apostle Paul was committed to “remembering the poor” (Galatians 2:7-10). He began his ministry as a poverty outreach (Acts 11:27-30) and coordinated the resources of churches in Greece and Macedonia for relief purposes (II Corinthians 8-9).

    We’ve all read the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37, where Jesus tells of a Samaritan who stepped in after the “righteous” men sidestepped their charitable responsibilities. He admonishes us to likewise shed our religious front, letting our actions reflect our true spiritual character. We are to look after orphans and widows in their distress (Luke 3:7-11), and we are told that true repentance is evidenced in sharing food and sustenance with the poor. Selfless giving is honored and blessed (Luke 6:38 and II Corinthians 9:6-8); a sign of genuine faith (James 2:14-17).

    God Himself is a cheerful giver and promises to repay any kindness shown to His children with abundance and blessing. Proverbs 14:21 tells us we will be happy if we are kind and generous to the poor. In Psalm 41:1-2 we read, “How blessed is he who considers the helpless; the Lord will deliver him in a day of trouble. The Lord will protect him, and keep him alive, and he shall be called blessed upon the earth.” Proverbs 11:25 states, “The generous man will be prosperous and he who waters will himself be watered.” However, equal to God’s joy over our generosity, is His distress when respond out of selfishness.

    “He who oppresses the poor, reproaches his Maker, but he who is gracious to the needy honors Him,” says Proverbs 14:31. And, in Proverbs 28:27 we are warned that, “He who gives to the poor will never want, but he who shuts his eyes will have many curses.”

    I’ve only scratched the surface, but I’ve not found any evidence that we, as Christians, should abdicate our responsibilities to the government. I believe we’ve already done that and are now paying the price for this omission. The government will default or tax us even more heavily. It can be successfully argued that we should reclaim our responsibility and get the government out of the welfare business. It has been stated many times recently, that we don’t have a fiscal problem – we have a spiritual problem.

  54. Ron F.

    On June 7, 2010 at 6:54 pm


    Any cursory review of this issue has to conclude that we have to change welfare as we know it. We simply cannot continue to handle this problem as we have in the past. Having established this as a premise, what does the Bible reveal about this critical matter? Can we discharge our responsibilities to the poor by personal charitable action or through supporting the humanitarian (i.e. welfare) policies of the State? President Lyndon Johnson\’s \”war on poverty\” is now into its third decade and there is ample evidence of its abysmal failure. Can we translate the advice given in the Bible as far back as 3,000 years ago into terms relative to the doing of God\’s work in the late twentieth century?

    Matthew 26:11 says, \”For the poor you have with you always…\” Does this mean we should just shrug our shoulders? Absolutely not! Welfare warrants Christian attention! We need to get our government out of the welfare role and put the Church (back) in it!

    Jesus Christ modeled a life and ministry of compassion to the poor. He mingled with them (Luke 5:1-11), ate with them (Luke 5:27-32), comforted them (Luke 12:22-34), fed them (Luke 9:10-17), healed them (Luke 5:12-16), and ministered them (Luke 7:18-23). Should not those who are called to \”conform themselves to His image\” (Romans 8:29) place a high priority on the care of the poor?

    Read the verses regarding Tabitha, a Godly women whose chief occupation was helping the poor as stated in Acts 9:36-41. In Acts 4:36-37, we read of Barnabas leaving an indelible mark on the early Christian communities by supplying the needs of the poor and, later in Acts 11:27-30, spearheading relief efforts and taking up collections for the famine-stricken. In II Corinthians 8:3-6, we find Titus organizing a collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem. Later, he oversaw relief efforts in Corinth (II Corinthians 8-9). The Apostle Paul was committed to \”remembering the poor\” (Galatians 2:7-10). He began his ministry as a poverty outreach (Acts 11:27-30) and coordinated the resources of churches in Greece and Macedonia for relief purposes (II Corinthians 8-9).

    We\’ve all read the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37, where Jesus tells of a Samaritan who stepped in after the \”righteous\” men sidestepped their charitable responsibilities. He admonishes us to likewise shed our religious front, letting our actions reflect our true spiritual character. We are to look after orphans and widows in their distress (Luke 3:7-11), and we are told that true repentance is evidenced in sharing food and sustenance with the poor. Selfless giving is honored and blessed (Luke 6:38 and II Corinthians 9:6-8); a sign of genuine faith (James 2:14-17).

    God Himself is a cheerful giver and promises to repay any kindness shown to His children with abundance and blessing. Proverbs 14:21 tells us we will be happy if we are kind and generous to the poor. In Psalm 41:1-2 we read, \”How blessed is he who considers the helpless; the Lord will deliver him in a day of trouble. The Lord will protect him, and keep him alive, and he shall be called blessed upon the earth.\” Proverbs 11:25 states, \”The generous man will be prosperous and he who waters will himself be watered.\” However, equal to God\’s joy over our generosity, is His distress when respond out of selfishness.

    \”He who oppresses the poor, reproaches his Maker, but he who is gracious to the needy honors Him,\” says Proverbs 14:31. And, in Proverbs 28:27 we are warned that, \”He who gives to the poor will never want, but he who shuts his eyes will have many curses.\”

    I\’ve only scratched the surface, but I’ve not found any evidence that we, as Christians, should abdicate our responsibilities to the government. I believe we’ve already done that and are now paying the price for this omission. The government will default or tax us even more heavily. It can be successfully argued that we should reclaim our responsibility and get the government out of the welfare business. It has been stated many times recently, that we don\’t have a fiscal problem – we have a spiritual problem.

  55. Ron F.

    On June 7, 2010 at 6:55 pm


    Any cursory review of this issue has to conclude that we have to change welfare as we know it. We simply cannot continue to handle this problem as we have in the past. Having established this as a premise, what does the Bible reveal about this critical matter? Can we discharge our responsibilities to the poor by personal charitable action or through supporting the humanitarian (i.e. welfare) policies of the State? President Lyndon Johnson\\\’s \\\”war on poverty\\\” is now into its third decade and there is ample evidence of its abysmal failure. Can we translate the advice given in the Bible as far back as 3,000 years ago into terms relative to the doing of God\\\’s work in the late twentieth century?

    Matthew 26:11 says, \\\”For the poor you have with you always…\\\” Does this mean we should just shrug our shoulders? Absolutely not! Welfare warrants Christian attention! We need to get our government out of the welfare role and put the Church (back) in it!

    Jesus Christ modeled a life and ministry of compassion to the poor. He mingled with them (Luke 5:1-11), ate with them (Luke 5:27-32), comforted them (Luke 12:22-34), fed them (Luke 9:10-17), healed them (Luke 5:12-16), and ministered them (Luke 7:18-23). Should not those who are called to \\\”conform themselves to His image\\\” (Romans 8:29) place a high priority on the care of the poor?

    Read the verses regarding Tabitha, a Godly women whose chief occupation was helping the poor as stated in Acts 9:36-41. In Acts 4:36-37, we read of Barnabas leaving an indelible mark on the early Christian communities by supplying the needs of the poor and, later in Acts 11:27-30, spearheading relief efforts and taking up collections for the famine-stricken. In II Corinthians 8:3-6, we find Titus organizing a collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem. Later, he oversaw relief efforts in Corinth (II Corinthians 8-9). The Apostle Paul was committed to \\\”remembering the poor\\\” (Galatians 2:7-10). He began his ministry as a poverty outreach (Acts 11:27-30) and coordinated the resources of churches in Greece and Macedonia for relief purposes (II Corinthians 8-9).

    We\\\’ve all read the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37, where Jesus tells of a Samaritan who stepped in after the \\\”righteous\\\” men sidestepped their charitable responsibilities. He admonishes us to likewise shed our religious front, letting our actions reflect our true spiritual character. We are to look after orphans and widows in their distress (Luke 3:7-11), and we are told that true repentance is evidenced in sharing food and sustenance with the poor. Selfless giving is honored and blessed (Luke 6:38 and II Corinthians 9:6-8); a sign of genuine faith (James 2:14-17).

    God Himself is a cheerful giver and promises to repay any kindness shown to His children with abundance and blessing. Proverbs 14:21 tells us we will be happy if we are kind and generous to the poor. In Psalm 41:1-2 we read, \\\”How blessed is he who considers the helpless; the Lord will deliver him in a day of trouble. The Lord will protect him, and keep him alive, and he shall be called blessed upon the earth.\\\” Proverbs 11:25 states, \\\”The generous man will be prosperous and he who waters will himself be watered.\\\” However, equal to God\\\’s joy over our generosity, is His distress when respond out of selfishness.

    \\\”He who oppresses the poor, reproaches his Maker, but he who is gracious to the needy honors Him,\\\” says Proverbs 14:31. And, in Proverbs 28:27 we are warned that, \\\”He who gives to the poor will never want, but he who shuts his eyes will have many curses.\\\”

    I\\\’ve only scratched the surface, but I have not found any evidence that we, as Christians, should abdicate our responsibilities to the government. I believe we have already done that and are now paying the price for this omission. The government will default or tax us even more heavily. It can be successfully argued that we should reclaim our responsibility and get the government out of the welfare business. It has been stated many times recently, that we don\\\’t have a fiscal problem – we have a spiritual problem.

  56. Ron

    On June 7, 2010 at 7:01 pm


    Any cursory review of this issue has to conclude that we have to change welfare as we know it. We simply cannot continue to handle this problem as we have in the past. Having established this as a premise, what does the Bible reveal about this critical matter? Can we discharge our responsibilities to the poor by personal charitable action or through supporting the humanitarian (i.e. welfare) policies of the State? President Lyndon Johnson’s “war on poverty” is now into its third decade and there is ample evidence of its abysmal failure. Can we translate the advice given in the Bible as far back as 3,000 years ago into terms relative to the doing of God’s work in the late twentieth century?

    Matthew 26:11 says, “For the poor you have with you always…” Does this mean we should just shrug our shoulders? Absolutely not! Welfare warrants Christian attention! We need to get our government out of the welfare role and put the Church (back) in it!

    Jesus Christ modeled a life and ministry of compassion to the poor. He mingled with them (Luke 5:1-11), ate with them (Luke 5:27-32), comforted them (Luke 12:22-34), fed them (Luke 9:10-17), healed them (Luke 5:12-16), and ministered them (Luke 7:18-23). Should not those who are called to “conform themselves to His image” (Romans 8:29) place a high priority on the care of the poor?

    Read the verses regarding Tabitha, a Godly woman whose chief occupation was helping the poor as stated in Acts 9:36-41. In Acts 4:36-37, we read of Barnabas leaving an indelible mark on the early Christian communities by supplying the needs of the poor and, later in Acts 11:27-30, spearheading relief efforts and taking up collections for the famine-stricken. In II Corinthians 8:3-6, we find Titus organizing a collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem. Later, he oversaw relief efforts in Corinth (II Corinthians 8-9). The Apostle Paul was committed to “remembering the poor” (Galatians 2:7-10). He began his ministry as a poverty outreach (Acts 11:27-30) and coordinated the resources of churches in Greece and Macedonia for relief purposes (II Corinthians 8-9).

    We have all read the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37, where Jesus tells of a Samaritan who stepped in after the “righteous” men sidestepped their charitable responsibilities. He admonishes us to likewise shed our religious front, letting our actions reflect our true spiritual character. We are to look after orphans and widows in their distress (Luke 3:7-11), and we are told that true repentance is evidenced in sharing food and sustenance with the poor. Selfless giving is honored and blessed (Luke 6:38 and II Corinthians 9:6-8); a sign of genuine faith (James 2:14-17).

    God Himself is a cheerful giver and promises to repay any kindness shown to His children with abundance and blessing. Proverbs 14:21 tells us we will be happy if we are kind and generous to the poor. In Psalm 41:1-2 we read, “How blessed is he who considers the helpless; the Lord will deliver him in a day of trouble. The Lord will protect him, and keep him alive, and he shall be called blessed upon the earth.” Proverbs 11:25 states, “The generous man will be prosperous and he who waters will himself be watered.” However, equal to God’s joy over our generosity, is His distress when respond out of selfishness.

    “He who oppresses the poor, reproaches his Maker, but he who is gracious to the needy honors Him,” says Proverbs 14:31. And, in Proverbs 28:27 we are warned that, “He who gives to the poor will never want, but he who shuts his eyes will have many curses.”

    I have only scratched the surface, but I have not found any evidence that we, as Christians, should abdicate our responsibilities to the government. I believe we have already done that and are now paying the price for this omission. The government will default or tax us even more heavily. It can be successfully argued that we should reclaim our responsibility and get the government out of the welfare business. It has been stated many times recently, that we don’t have a fiscal problem – we have a spiritual problem.

  57. Ron

    On June 7, 2010 at 7:01 pm


    Any cursory review of this issue has to conclude that we have to change welfare as we know it. We simply cannot continue to handle this problem as we have in the past. Having established this as a premise, what does the Bible reveal about this critical matter? Can we discharge our responsibilities to the poor by personal charitable action or through supporting the humanitarian (i.e. welfare) policies of the State? President Lyndon Johnson\’s \”war on poverty\” is now into its third decade and there is ample evidence of its abysmal failure. Can we translate the advice given in the Bible as far back as 3,000 years ago into terms relative to the doing of God\’s work in the late twentieth century?

    Matthew 26:11 says, \”For the poor you have with you always…\” Does this mean we should just shrug our shoulders? Absolutely not! Welfare warrants Christian attention! We need to get our government out of the welfare role and put the Church (back) in it!

    Jesus Christ modeled a life and ministry of compassion to the poor. He mingled with them (Luke 5:1-11), ate with them (Luke 5:27-32), comforted them (Luke 12:22-34), fed them (Luke 9:10-17), healed them (Luke 5:12-16), and ministered them (Luke 7:18-23). Should not those who are called to \”conform themselves to His image\” (Romans 8:29) place a high priority on the care of the poor?

    Read the verses regarding Tabitha, a Godly woman whose chief occupation was helping the poor as stated in Acts 9:36-41. In Acts 4:36-37, we read of Barnabas leaving an indelible mark on the early Christian communities by supplying the needs of the poor and, later in Acts 11:27-30, spearheading relief efforts and taking up collections for the famine-stricken. In II Corinthians 8:3-6, we find Titus organizing a collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem. Later, he oversaw relief efforts in Corinth (II Corinthians 8-9). The Apostle Paul was committed to \”remembering the poor\” (Galatians 2:7-10). He began his ministry as a poverty outreach (Acts 11:27-30) and coordinated the resources of churches in Greece and Macedonia for relief purposes (II Corinthians 8-9).

    We have all read the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37, where Jesus tells of a Samaritan who stepped in after the \”righteous\” men sidestepped their charitable responsibilities. He admonishes us to likewise shed our religious front, letting our actions reflect our true spiritual character. We are to look after orphans and widows in their distress (Luke 3:7-11), and we are told that true repentance is evidenced in sharing food and sustenance with the poor. Selfless giving is honored and blessed (Luke 6:38 and II Corinthians 9:6-8); a sign of genuine faith (James 2:14-17).

    God Himself is a cheerful giver and promises to repay any kindness shown to His children with abundance and blessing. Proverbs 14:21 tells us we will be happy if we are kind and generous to the poor. In Psalm 41:1-2 we read, \”How blessed is he who considers the helpless; the Lord will deliver him in a day of trouble. The Lord will protect him, and keep him alive, and he shall be called blessed upon the earth.\” Proverbs 11:25 states, \”The generous man will be prosperous and he who waters will himself be watered.\” However, equal to God\’s joy over our generosity, is His distress when respond out of selfishness.

    \”He who oppresses the poor, reproaches his Maker, but he who is gracious to the needy honors Him,\” says Proverbs 14:31. And, in Proverbs 28:27 we are warned that, \”He who gives to the poor will never want, but he who shuts his eyes will have many curses.\”

    I have only scratched the surface, but I have not found any evidence that we, as Christians, should abdicate our responsibilities to the government. I believe we have already done that and are now paying the price for this omission. The government will default or tax us even more heavily. It can be successfully argued that we should reclaim our responsibility and get the government out of the welfare business. It has been stated many times recently, that we don\’t have a fiscal problem – we have a spiritual problem.

  58. ali

    On September 11, 2010 at 4:46 pm


    Great article i coudlnt agree with you more. Welfare is the reason why people dont get jobs. I know someone who lost used to make 300 bucks and lost his job, now he is on welfare gettin more than 300 per week and he has oppurtinitues to get a job but he says why should i get a job when i sit home and get more money? Thats the problem with our welfare. Democrats want to give handouts rather than make those people get their lazy asses off the couch and get a damn job like the rest of us. Bill clinton is the only democrat i remember that actually lowered the welfare and made people get jobs..i dont want to pay for some lazy guys living when he can sit on his ass and eat and drink all day.

  59. :)

    On November 5, 2010 at 5:54 pm


    you know what? some people have kids and are single mothers. If you had kids you would know how hard it is to leave your kids by themselves to go to a job, e.g you cant. not every one can be an uptight snob like you ok? so get over it :)

  60. lee

    On November 5, 2010 at 5:54 pm


    you know what? some people have kids and are single mothers. If you had kids you would know how hard it is to leave your kids by themselves to go to a job, e.g you cant. not every one can be an uptight snob like you ok? so get over it :)

  61. sally brantingham

    On February 8, 2011 at 4:41 pm


    Welfare is the most reduculous thing that has ever happend. get off your lazy ass and do something about it. :)

  62. Sally Smith

    On May 9, 2011 at 9:44 am


    this is super lame information. there is no facts. i needed this information for school and none of this was useful i just wasted my time…

  63. Noah

    On July 19, 2011 at 9:37 am


    You’re being pretty bias about this, there are people who need welfare that work really hard and can’t get ahead in life at all do to children, criminal records, or homeless who can’t find a place to take a shower and shave for a job interview, not every poor person is lazy. Also there are the drug users though who use welfare just for drugs, and there are citizens from every class high, middle, and low who are lazy and want the extra money when they don’t need it.

  64. Fuck Jake Marcob

    On August 25, 2011 at 10:35 pm


    you really suck fat cock

  65. Reality

    On March 22, 2012 at 3:48 am


    This is the most crap argument I have ever read, and no I am not on welfare… i\’m just not a fucking moron.

  66. Reality

    On March 22, 2012 at 3:48 am


    This is the most crap argument I have ever read, and no I am not on welfare… i\\\’m just not a fucking moron.

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