You are here: Home » Subcultures » More Old Folk Sayings

More Old Folk Sayings

More old folk sayings are being lost every day. I grew up hearing them everyday and I miss them as they disappear from our vocabulary.

I said in the first article I wrote how much I love these Old Folk Sayings, but in case you haven’t read the first article, I will repeat myself. I grew up hearing all these colorful sayings every day. I didn’t know how unique we were at the time and I didn’t appreciate our heritage as I do now.

Our people came from Ireland, Scotland, Germany and England. They brought the Old World language with them to the North Georgia hills and kept it much longer than other parts of America. It has all but disappeared now and it makes me sad to see it go.

I heard Ingerns for onions. Kivers for covers, closet for bathroom, and so many I have forgotten. I wish I had written them all down, but I wasn’t interested at the time. Some of the phrases pop in my head and when I use them everyone gives me a look as if to say” Have you lost your mind?” My better half encourages me in my foolishness though. He is from South Africa and he likes the sound of it. He also likes my north Georgia Hill Billy accent.

Some of those phrases I remember are written below:

  1. He has a yellow streak down his back a mile wide.
  2. Grinnin like a suck egg hound.
  3. That hen rules the roost.
  4. Like a fox in the hen house
  5. Don’t try to feed me sour grapes.
  6. It will all come out in the washing.
  7. Blow the soot out of it.
  8. Hold your horses.
  9. Two cooks in the kitchen will spoil the broth.
  10. Ask me no questions and I’ll tell you no lies.
  11. Like a fly to honey
  12. The devil take him.
  13. You better watch out, old scratch will get you.
  14. The devil take the hindmost.
  15. Give him tit for tat.
  16. Don’t blow hot air in my face.
  17. You’ve got me between a rock and a hard place.
  18. Have you come to see how the poor folks live?
  19. Pretty is pretty to the skin but ugly is ugly to the bone.
  20. She’s so ugly the devil wouldn’t have her.
  21. She wears the pants in that family.
  22. What she says goes in one ear and out the other.
  23. He’s a chip off the old block.
  24. Has the cat got your tongue?
  25. I’ll knock you ten day to Sunday.
  26. You can put that where the sun don’t shine.
  27. They treat me like a red headed step child.
  28. Put up or shut up.
  29. Put your money where your mouth is.
  30. My daddy didn’t raise me to tell lies.
  31. He’s as sneaky as a yellow bellied hound dog.
  32. The truth will out.
  33. Listen to him cuss a blue streak.
  34. It never rains but it pours.
  35. He’s as mean as a rattle snake.
  36. She’s smart as a whip.
  37. They are a rag tag bunch.
  38. She’s cute as the dickens.
  39. You can’t trump my ace.
  40. He has her in his back pocket.
  41. He’s hen pecked.
  42. There he goes shittin and a flying.
  43. That dog won’t hunt.
  44. She’s uglier than a mud fence.
  45. He acts like he’s got a burr up his butt.
  46. If you can’t stand the heat get out of the kitchen.
  47. Put up or shut up.
  48. Just as shore as God made little green apples.
  49. Shut your fly trap.
  50. Don’t let the door hit you on the way out.
  51. She’s purty as a new penny.
  52. He’s the pure d devil.
  53. Don’t she think she’s something?
  54. She’s tryin to act proper.
  55. Don’t give me that hound dog grin.

http://www.triond.com/rw/6239 click here if you would like to publish your articles of interest and earn income.

http://socyberty.com/folklore/a-jack-pot-of-old-folks-sayings/

http://authspot.com/poetry/country-folks-had-a-way-with-words/

http://socyberty.com/languages/north-georgia-mountain-dialect/

http://gomestic.com/cooking/poke-salet-wild-onionsand-corn-bread/

http://gomestic.com/cooking/good-mountain-cooking/

10
Liked it
User Comments
  1. Candy

    On September 11, 2007 at 4:33 pm


    I like these. I have a feeling I have added to my vocabulary.

  2. Darlene McFarlane

    On September 14, 2007 at 6:01 pm


    Have we really changed the way we talk that much!? I remember these and believe it or not, I still use a couple myself.

  3. Sandy

    On September 15, 2007 at 8:50 pm


    I have heard some of these. They have a nice ring and make a lot of sense.

  4. Harold

    On September 15, 2007 at 8:53 pm


    Thanks for reminding me.

  5. Hilda Kincaid

    On October 20, 2007 at 1:20 pm


    Oh Yes, I remember some of these.Haven’t heard any in a long time but they take me back.

  6. Charlie black

    On July 19, 2009 at 6:30 pm


    I remember hearing some of these saying from my grandmother and my mother whike growing up but also to one saying that i will never forget ” you may want horns but you’ll die buttheaded”

  7. Ruby Hawk

    On August 1, 2009 at 12:25 am


    Thank you my friends, I love all these old folk sayings. I grew up hearing these every day of my life. I just love em.

  8. Katie Marketello

    On January 31, 2010 at 11:25 pm


    Am I part of a weird subculture or something? I’m from a small rural town in California, but the origins of the phrases via my dad and us can be traced to my papa (grandpa) who was a city kid. So it trips me out (stumps me) that whoever wrote this is saying they were popular in rural places where they don’t even use them anymore. A lot of these phrases I still hear tons or a lot at least and even by kids! And I’m only 20, my dad 50, my grandpa almost 80. Hen rules the roost, I’ve heard, but I often hear he/she rules the roost. Never heard hen pecked but my dad says “don’t hen peck”. Similar he says “quit bein a ball buster”, or “quit bustin his balls”, in reference to me, if I happen to bitch out my boyfriend. My dad says the one about having someone in your back pocket when discussing politics. I’ve heard “fox in the hen house” quite a bit. I hear “hold your horses” on a daily basis, especially by kids. I hear “ask me no questions, I’ll tell you no lies”, that seems to be one ppl tell you more as a “youngin”. Fly to honey is heard, but “like a moth to flame” is common. Once my 77yr old papa said of my sister, “boys are gonna be buzzin around her like bees on honey”. He also said one I liked, referring to a friend from his younger years in san francisco who would put snakes in his mouth to impress, “but he wasn’t playing with a full deck”. I’ve heard tit for tat, not sure but I think it means maybe the same as an eye for an eye. I hear between a rock and a hard place very often. I hear anybody old enough to have an opinion on the matter say she wears the pants in that house or in that relationship, younger kids might just say she’s the boss. I hear in one ear and out the other all the time from all ages. I hear “chip off the old block” a lot a lot, or “the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree”, if the similarity seems to be a negative one between a parent and grown child. I hear kids teasing eachother, or when an adult addresses a kid, “cat got your tongue?” But it’s always used when someone is amused. I hear “put it where the sun don’t shine”, or kiss my ass (hey i wonder if one day kiss my ass will be long gone and fondly remembered haha) I’ve heard red headed step child once or twice haha. I always hear put up or shut up/put your money where your mouth is. Never heard curse a blue streak just always “he/she cusses like a sailor”. Never heard “it doesn’t rain it pours” just the variation “when it rains, it pours”. I always hear “smart as a whip” is it a coincidence that the author said “she’s smart as a whip”? Cuz i feel like we don’t say it about men. I feel like for men we use “he’s real sharp” or “he isn’t real sharp”, or I think this is only among the younger generation we always say, “he/she isn’t the sharpest tool in the shed”. Or if your talking about a kid or pet sorry to compare them, you say he/she is or isn’t “real bright”. I haven’t heard she is as cute as the dickens, but my papa walker, my great grandpa died at 94 and lived on a farm in Idaho (his ppl farmers from Indiana) before the 1920’s, he would always say “oh we used to “catch the dickens” for that” meaning getting hit with a switch or a belt. or maybe just getting shouted at. Never heard trump my ace, but my dad has always called his kids “ace” he’ll say “hey ace”. The reason I looked at this page was because I love the song by Mary J. Blige, “Kitchen” and searched for the meaning of the lyrics, even though the general idea is that she doesn’t want this girl talking to her man, she says “never let a girl cook in your kitchen, all up in your fridge and next will be the stove, I don’t need no extra ingredients, there ain’t enough cabinet space for 2, etc etc. And in the comments someone said for those of you who don’t get it it’s an old adage, which led me to this page and the saying, “two cooks in the kitchen will spoil the broth.” now can someone tell me exactly what this applies to? Also, if the author reads this, could you define all these, otherwise newcomers won’t know how to use them. I’d like to know the meanings of those I don’t.

  9. Katie Marketello

    On January 31, 2010 at 11:35 pm


    Am I part of a weird subculture or something? I’m from a small rural town in California, but the origins of the phrases via my dad and us can be traced to my papa (grandpa) who was a city kid. So it trips me out (stumps me) that whoever wrote this is saying they were popular in rural places where they don’t even use them anymore. A lot of these phrases I still hear tons or a lot at least and even by kids! And I’m only 20, my dad 50, my grandpa almost 80. Hen rules the roost, I’ve heard, but I often hear he/she rules the roost. Never heard hen pecked but my dad says don’t hen peck. Similar he says quit bein a ball buster, or quit bustin his balls”, in reference to me, if I happen to bitch out my boyfriend. My dad says the one about having someone in your back pocket when discussing politics. I’ve heard fox in the hen house quite a bit. I hear hold your horses on a daily basis, especially by kids. I hear ask me no questions, I’ll tell you no lies, that seems to be one ppl tell you more as a youngin. Fly to honey is heard, but like a moth to flame is common. Once my 77yr old papa said of my sister, boys are gonna be buzzin around her like bees on honey. He also said one I liked, referring to a friend from his younger years in san francisco who would put snakes in his mouth to impress, but he wasn’t playing with a full deck. I’ve heard tit for tat, not sure but I think it means maybe the same as an eye for an eye. I hear between a rock and a hard place very often. I hear anybody old enough to have an opinion on the matter say she wears the pants in that house or in that relationship, younger kids might just say she’s the boss. I hear in one ear and out the other all the time from all ages. I hear chip off the old block a lot a lot, or the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree”, if the similarity seems to be a negative one between a parent and grown child. I hear kids teasing eachother, or when an adult addresses a kid, cat got your tongue? But it’s always used when someone is amused. I hear put it where the sun don’t shine, or kiss my ass (hey i wonder if one day kiss my ass will be long gone and fondly remembered haha) I’ve heard red headed step child once or twice haha. I always hear put up or shut up/put your money where your mouth is. Never heard curse a blue streak just always he/she cusses like a sailor. Never heard it doesn’t rain it pours just the variation when it rains, it pours. I always hear smart as a whip is it a coincidence that the author said she’s smart as a whip? Cuz i feel like we don’t say it about men. I feel like for men we use he’s real sharp or he isn’t real sharp, or I think this is only among the younger generation we always say, he/she isn’t the sharpest tool in the shed”. Or if your talking about a kid or pet sorry to compare them, you say he/she is or isn’t real bright. I haven’t heard she is as cute as the dickens, but my papa walker, my great grandpa died at 94 and lived on a farm in Idaho (his ppl farmers from Indiana) before the 1920’s, he would always say oh we used to catch the dickens for that meaning getting hit with a switch or a belt. or maybe just getting shouted at. Never heard trump my ace, but my dad has always called his kids ace he’ll say, hey ace. The reason I looked at this page was because I love the song by Mary J. Blige, Kitchen, and searched for the meaning of the lyrics, even though the general idea is that she doesn’t want this girl talking to her man, she says never let a girl cook in your kitchen, all up in your fridge and next will be the stove, I don’t need no extra ingredients, there ain’t enough cabinet space for 2, etc etc. And in the comments someone said for those of you who don’t get it it’s an old adage, which led me to this page and the saying, two cooks in the kitchen will spoil the broth. now can someone tell me exactly what this applies to? Also, if the author reads this, could you define all these, otherwise newcomers won’t know how to use them. I’d like to know the meanings of those I don’t.

  10. Katie Marketello

    On January 31, 2010 at 11:36 pm


    Am I part of a weird subculture or something? I\’m from a small rural town in California, but the origins of the phrases via my dad and us can be traced to my papa (grandpa) who was a city kid. So it trips me out (stumps me) that whoever wrote this is saying they were popular in rural places where they don\’t even use them anymore. A lot of these phrases I still hear tons or a lot at least and even by kids! And I\’m only 20, my dad 50, my grandpa almost 80. Hen rules the roost, I\’ve heard, but I often hear he/she rules the roost. Never heard hen pecked but my dad says don\’t hen peck. Similar he says quit bein a ball buster, or quit bustin his balls\”, in reference to me, if I happen to bitch out my boyfriend. My dad says the one about having someone in your back pocket when discussing politics. I\’ve heard fox in the hen house quite a bit. I hear hold your horses on a daily basis, especially by kids. I hear ask me no questions, I\’ll tell you no lies, that seems to be one ppl tell you more as a youngin. Fly to honey is heard, but like a moth to flame is common. Once my 77yr old papa said of my sister, boys are gonna be buzzin around her like bees on honey. He also said one I liked, referring to a friend from his younger years in san francisco who would put snakes in his mouth to impress, but he wasn\’t playing with a full deck. I\’ve heard tit for tat, not sure but I think it means maybe the same as an eye for an eye. I hear between a rock and a hard place very often. I hear anybody old enough to have an opinion on the matter say she wears the pants in that house or in that relationship, younger kids might just say she\’s the boss. I hear in one ear and out the other all the time from all ages. I hear chip off the old block a lot a lot, or the apple doesn\’t fall far from the tree\”, if the similarity seems to be a negative one between a parent and grown child. I hear kids teasing eachother, or when an adult addresses a kid, cat got your tongue? But it\’s always used when someone is amused. I hear put it where the sun don\’t shine, or kiss my ass (hey i wonder if one day kiss my ass will be long gone and fondly remembered haha) I\’ve heard red headed step child once or twice haha. I always hear put up or shut up/put your money where your mouth is. Never heard curse a blue streak just always he/she cusses like a sailor. Never heard it doesn\’t rain it pours just the variation when it rains, it pours. I always hear smart as a whip is it a coincidence that the author said she\’s smart as a whip? Cuz i feel like we don\’t say it about men. I feel like for men we use he\’s real sharp or he isn\’t real sharp, or I think this is only among the younger generation we always say, he/she isn\’t the sharpest tool in the shed\”. Or if your talking about a kid or pet sorry to compare them, you say he/she is or isn\’t real bright. I haven\’t heard she is as cute as the dickens, but my papa walker, my great grandpa died at 94 and lived on a farm in Idaho (his ppl farmers from Indiana) before the 1920\’s, he would always say oh we used to catch the dickens for that meaning getting hit with a switch or a belt. or maybe just getting shouted at. Never heard trump my ace, but my dad has always called his kids ace he\’ll say, hey ace. The reason I looked at this page was because I love the song by Mary J. Blige, Kitchen, and searched for the meaning of the lyrics, even though the general idea is that she doesn\’t want this girl talking to her man, she says never let a girl cook in your kitchen, all up in your fridge and next will be the stove, I don\’t need no extra ingredients, there ain\’t enough cabinet space for 2, etc etc. And in the comments someone said for those of you who don\’t get it it\’s an old adage, which led me to this page and the saying, two cooks in the kitchen will spoil the broth. now can someone tell me exactly what this applies to? Also, if the author reads this, could you define all these, otherwise newcomers won\’t know how to use them. I\’d like to know the meanings of those I don\’t.

  11. Katie Marketello

    On January 31, 2010 at 11:41 pm


    Am I part of a weird subculture or something? Im from a small rural town in California, but the origins of the phrases via my dad and us can be traced to my papa (grandpa) who was a city kid. So it trips me out (stumps me) that whoever wrote this is saying they were popular in rural places where they dont even use them anymore. A lot of these phrases I still hear tons or a lot at least and even by kids! And Im only 20, my dad 50, my grandpa almost 80. Hen rules the roost, Ive heard, but I often hear he/she rules the roost. Never heard hen pecked but my dad says dont hen peck. Similar he says quit bein a ball buster, or quit bustin his balls, in reference to me, if I happen to bitch out my boyfriend. My dad says the one about having someone in your back pocket when discussing politics. Ive heard fox in the hen house quite a bit. I hear hold your horses on a daily basis, especially by kids. I hear ask me no questions, Ill tell you no lies, that seems to be one ppl tell you more as a youngin. Fly to honey is heard, but like a moth to flame is common. Once my 77yr old papa said of my sister, boys are gonna be buzzin around her like bees on honey. He also said one I liked, referring to a friend from his younger years in san francisco who would put snakes in his mouth to impress, but he wasnt playing with a full deck. Ive heard tit for tat, not sure but I think it means maybe the same as an eye for an eye. I hear between a rock and a hard place very often. I hear anybody old enough to have an opinion on the matter say she wears the pants in that house or in that relationship, younger kids might just say shes the boss. I hear in one ear and out the other all the time from all ages. I hear chip off the old block a lot a lot, or the apple doesnt fall far from the tree, if the similarity seems to be a negative one between a parent and grown child. I hear kids teasing eachother, or when an adult addresses a kid, cat got your tongue? But its always used when someone is amused. I hear put it where the sun dont shine, or kiss my ass (hey i wonder if one day kiss my ass will be long gone and fondly remembered haha) Ive heard red headed step child once or twice haha. I always hear put up or shut up/put your money where your mouth is. Never heard curse a blue streak just always he/she cusses like a sailor. Never heard it doesnt rain it pours just the variation when it rains, it pours. I always hear smart as a whip is it a coincidence that the author said shes smart as a whip? Cuz i feel like we dont say it about men. I feel like for men we use hes real sharp or he isnt real sharp, or I think this is only among the younger generation we always say, he/she isnt the sharpest tool in the shed. Or if your talking about a kid or pet sorry to compare them, you say he/she is or isnt real bright. I havent heard she is as cute as the dickens, but my papa walker, my great grandpa died at 94 and lived on a farm in Idaho (his ppl farmers from Indiana) before the 1920s, he would always say oh we used to catch the dickens for that meaning getting hit with a switch or a belt. or maybe just getting shouted at. Never heard trump my ace, but my dad has always called his kids ace hell say, hey ace. The reason I looked at this page was because I love the song by Mary J. Blige, Kitchen, and searched for the meaning of the lyrics, even though the general idea is that she doesnt want this girl talking to her man, she says never let a girl cook in your kitchen, all up in your fridge and next will be the stove, I dont need no extra ingredients, there aint enough cabinet space for 2, etc etc. And in the comments someone said for those of you who dont get it its an old adage, which led me to this page and the saying, two cooks in the kitchen will spoil the broth. now can someone tell me exactly what this applies to? Also, if the author reads this, could you define all these, otherwise newcomers wont know how to use them. Id like to know the meanings of those I dont.

  12. WRANDY SASSER

    On May 25, 2010 at 5:50 pm


    I USE TO HEAR MY DADDY SAY THIS ONE ALL THE TIME. .HE;D RATHER CLIMB A TREE AND TELL A LIE THAN STAND ON THE GROUND AND TELL THE TRUTH.

Post Comment
Powered by Powered by Triond
-->